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Can B cells break the bound­aries of cell ther­a­py? Long­wood start­up has $52M to prove a new en­gi­neer­ing tech

Back in December 2017, as the cell therapy world was still basking in the virtually back-to-back approvals of two pioneering CAR-Ts, researchers at Seattle Children’s Research Institute reported a scientific first in a different corner of the field: engineer B cells to treat disease.

The team, led by David Rawlings and Richard James, eventually worked with Longwood Fund to start a biotech around those findings. And now Atlas Venture and RA Capital Management are coming on board to lead a $52 million launch round, joined by Alta Partners, for Be Biopharma.

CEO Marc Gleeson (Azura)

Azu­ra Oph­thalmics gets a $20M boost for its R&D work on eye dis­eases

Three years after closing a $16 million Series B, the same group of investors are back to give Azura Ophthalmics a $20 million boost.

That brings the Tel Aviv-Yafo, Israel-based biotech’s total fundraise to $38 million, and should pave the way for a registration study of its lead candidate in Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) and related eye diseases, CEO Marc Gleeson told Endpoints News.

The topical candidate, dubbed AZR-MD-001, is designed to address abnormal hyperkeratinization, or the build-up and shedding of proteins at the opening of or within the Meibomian gland. When Meibomian glands become dysfunctional, rapid evaporation of the tear film can occur, leading to dry eye disease.

Bo Cumbo, AavantiBio CEO (file photo)

Bo Cum­bo jumps from the top com­mer­cial post at Sarep­ta to the helm of a gene ther­a­py start­up with some in­flu­en­tial back­ers, big plans and $107M

After a 7-year stretch building the commercial team at Sarepta, longtime drug salesman Bo Cumbo is jumping to the entrepreneurial side of the business, taking the helm of a startup that’s got several deep-pocket investors. And he’s not just bringing his experience in selling drugs.

He tells me that when he told Sarepta CEO Doug Ingram about it, his boss got excited about the venture and opted to jump in with a $15 million investment from Sarepta to add to the launch money, alongside 3 of the busiest investors in biotech.

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Peter Kolchinsky and Raj Shah (file photo)

Pe­ter Kolchin­sky and Raj Shah's RA Cap­i­tal has $461M more to play with, af­ter 'rapid' in­vest­ment in the last 15 months

Just over 15 months after launching its first venture fund, RA Capital Management is ready for more. And this time the firm is bringing an even bigger load of cash to the table.

Announcing the close of its Nexus II fund on Wednesday, RA said it raised $461 million for investments in private companies across the biotech industry. The first venture fund, which raised $300 million, has churned through roughly 80% of its capital already, a pace that managing partner Raj Shah called unusually quick.

Philipp Spycher, Araris CEO

Promis­ing bet­ter link­er tech to ADC field, Araris has 'very, very am­bi­tious' plans for the clin­ic

A couple months after raising CHF 2.5 million ($2.76 million) in initial seed funding, one-year-old Araris Biotech is topping off the round with another CHF 12.7 million ($14 million).

The Paul Scherrer Institute and ETH Zurich spinout now has CHF 15.2 million to work with, and CEO Philipp Spycher has big plans. He hopes to bring one of the company’s antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) to the clinic by late 2022 or early 2023. “It’s very, very ambitious, but we are very optimistic that we actually can make it,” he said.

CEO Grace Colón (InCarda)

Look­ing to re­pur­pose an old drug to treat ir­reg­u­lar heart­beats, In­Car­da rais­es $30M in first Se­ries C close

A little less than two years after completing its $42 million Series B round, InCarda has returned to the venture well.

The San Francisco-based biotech announced the first portion of its Series C on Wednesday, pulling in $30 million in new funding. Most of the money will give enough runway for InCarda’s InRhythm program, an inhaled therapeutic aiming to treat sudden episodes of irregular heartbeats, through its Phase II trials and prepare it for Phase III.

Steve Chen, Cellis Therapeutics president and CMO (Cellics)

UC San Diego spin­out award­ed up to $15M for nanosponge de­signed to soak up sep­sis-caus­ing tox­ins

CARB-X, a global partnership looking to spur the development of new antibacterial drugs, is awarding Cellics Therapeutics $3.94 million to do what president and CMO Steve Chen calls “looking at traditional drug development upside down.”

Instead of going after a target directly — in this case bacterial toxins and inflammatory cytokines that cause sepsis — Cellics researchers “flip it around” to examine the host cells being attacked. The UC San Diego spinout then creates what it calls “nanosponges” — nanoparticles cloaked in the fragments of macrophage cell membranes. Chen says the “sponges” are designed to trap the sepsis-causing endotoxins and cytokines on their cell membranes, neutralizing them.

Spar­ingVi­sion rais­es $52M to kick off long jour­ney for a next-gen gene ther­a­py that goes much, much broad­er than Lux­tur­na

Until Spark Therapeutics’ pioneering gene therapy, Luxturna, came along, patients with retinitis pigmentosa had few treatment options. Even after it was approved, though, the majority were left with the exact same options.

Because it’s targeting mutations in a specific gene known as RPE65, Luxturna can only address 2 to 3% of the entire RP population, Stephane Boissel told Endpoints News.

Boissel is the newly-minted CEO of SparingVision, a French biotech co-founded by José-Alain Sahel and Thierry Léveillard at the Institut de la Vision. They have their sight set on a new kind of AAV construct — a next-generation gene therapy if you will — that can treat all patients of RP independent of genetic mutations.

Sean McClain, AbSci

Months af­ter strik­ing a deal with Sanofi, Ab­Sci nails its largest fundraise yet to sup­port its pro­tein print­ing tech

Months after nailing down a $10.4 million Series D and a partnership with French pharma giant Sanofi, AbSci is pulling in its largest fundraise yet — $65 million to advance what it calls its protein printing tech.

The Vancouver, WA-based biotech is working on a more efficient way to manufacture proteins — from full-length antibodies to insulin — using E. coli. The company says it’s on a quest to make protein production “as simple as DNA synthesis,” allowing for swift production of difficult-to-produce biotherapeutics. It’s tagging the Series E for expansion of its production capacity, which includes a new 60,000-square-foot facility in Vancouver.

MD An­der­son es­tab­lish­es new $50M+ biotech fund to choose the next promis­ing can­cer ther­a­pies

Researchers at MD Anderson have a new partner to help them get early-stage programs into the clinic.

In conjunction with The Focus Fund, MD Anderson is launching the Cancer Focus Fund to advance investigational cancer therapies from late preclinical development through Phase I and Phase Ib/II clinical trials. The fund will start off with more than $50 million of initial capital.

“Without appropriate support, we know that some therapies with great potential may be delayed, may not be developed properly in the clinical setting or may never make it into clinical studies,” MD Anderson senior VP Ferran Prat said in a statement. “Through investment from the Cancer Focus Fund and the support of MD Anderson, we hope to advance worthwhile new treatments past the traditional hurdles in the drug development process.”