Academia, Combos, Immuno-oncology

Incyte turns to Penn for a collaboration on next-gen cancer combos

Abramson Cancer Center – Penn Medicine


Incyte has signed off on a multi-year deal to collaborate with scientists at the University of Pennsylvania on its next-gen combos and cancer therapies.

The university’s Abramson Cancer Center will take a lead role in looking at patient selection and combination opportunities as Incyte advances its plans to develop new and more effective immunotherapies. And they’ll be collaborating on a bioinformatics program in clinical immunotherapy.

These kinds of academic tie-ups have become a popular feature in cancer R&D, as developers develop close ties with top investigators in the field. There’s no word on how much Incyte will pay to support the work.

Reid Huber, Incyte

Merck and Incyte are already partnered on a combination study using the pharma giant’s checkpoint inhibitor Keytruda. And just days ago they laid out an expansion of the clinical development program, with plans to initiate pivotal studies of Incyte’s epacadostat in combination with Keytruda in four additional tumors: non-small cell lung cancer, renal cell carcinoma, bladder cancer and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

“Incyte and Abramson are mutually committed to the advancement of science and improving the lives of patients with cancer. This alliance will allow us to mobilize two groups of leading scientists toward the collective goal of advancing the field of immunotherapy,” said Reid Huber, PhD, Chief Scientific Officer at Incyte. “We are excited for the opportunity to partner with the world-class researchers at Abramson and investigate new avenues for the treatment of patients with cancer.”


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