Just how big is the bio­phar­ma deal­mak­ing world? In 2019 we saw mega­bil­lions in cash change hands, and that's just the tip of the ice­berg

Back on New Year’s day at the beginning of 2019, two Chinese biotechs called HJB and MabSpace Biosciences merged into one outfit aiming to conquer the world with an antibody platform they said could create new drugs for a range of diseases.

You probably never heard of it, but their merger deal was the opening shot for a 365-day burst of dealmaking around the biotech world. At a time unprecedented sums are being invested in developing drugs around the world, the matchmaking that goes on between a multitude of players from Boston to Paris and London to Shanghai has reached a fever pitch.

Chris Dokomajilar at DealForma has made a career out of piecing together a complete mosaic of everything visible in the public domain. And it’s extensive.

In 2019 Dokomajilar plumbed a multitude of sources to track 2,303 deals — licensing pacts, options, buyouts, mergers, R&D alliances, you name it. Most surfaced briefly without any numbers attached to the blizzard of releases they inspired. One, Bristol-Myers’ $74 billion Celgene buyout, reshaped the top 20 list of M&A deals over the last decade.

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The DCT-OS: A Tech­nol­o­gy-first Op­er­at­ing Sys­tem - En­abling Clin­i­cal Tri­als

As technology-enabled clinical research becomes the new normal, an integrated decentralized clinical trial operating system can ensure quality, deliver consistency and improve the patient experience.

The increasing availability of COVID-19 vaccines has many of us looking forward to a time when everyday things return to a state of normal. Schools and teachers are returning to classrooms, offices and small businesses are reopening, and there’s a palpable sense of optimism that the often-awkward adjustments we’ve all made personally and professionally in the last year are behind us, never to return. In the world of clinical research, however, some pandemic-necessitated adjustments are proving to be more than emergency stopgap measures to ensure trial continuity — and numerous decentralized clinical trial (DCT) tools and methodologies employed within the last year are likely here to stay as part of biopharma’s new normal.

Roger Perl­mut­ter’s new gig, Covid-19 IP dra­ma, Vivek Ra­maswamy's coach on the SPAC train, and more

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UP­DAT­ED: EMA safe­ty com­mit­tee seeks more in­fo on heart in­flam­ma­tion fol­low­ing Pfiz­er Covid-19 vac­cine

The European Medicines Agency’s safety committee said Friday that it’s aware of cases of inflammation of the heart muscle and inflammation of the membrane around the heart, mainly reported following vaccination with Pfizer’s Covid-19 vaccine, known in Europe as Comirnaty.

“There is no indication that these cases are due to the vaccine,” the EMA’s Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee said.

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Onno van de Stolpe, Galapagos CEO (Thierry Roge/Belga Mag/AFP via Getty Images)

Gala­pa­gos chops in­to their pipeline, drop­ping core fields and re­or­ga­niz­ing R&D as the BD team hunts for some­thing 'trans­for­ma­tive'

Just 5 months after Gilead gutted its rich partnership with Galapagos following a bitter setback at the FDA, the Belgian biotech is hunkering down and chopping the pipeline in an effort to conserve cash while their BD team pursues a mission to find a “transformative” deal for the company.

The filgotinib disaster didn’t warrant a mention as Galapagos laid out its Darwinian restructuring plans. Forced to make choices, the company is ditching its IPF molecule ’1205, while moving ahead with a Phase II IPF study for its chitinase inhibitor ’4617.

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'Chang­ing the whole game of drug dis­cov­ery': Leg­endary R&D vet Roger Perl­mut­ter leaps back in­to work as a biotech CEO

Roger Perlmutter needs no introduction to anyone remotely involved in biopharma. As the R&D chief first at Amgen and then Merck, he’s built a stellar reputation and a prolific career steering new drugs toward the market for everything from cancer to infectious diseases.

But for years, he’s also held a less known title: science partner at The Column Group, where he’s regularly consulted about the various ideas the VCs had for new startups.

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As­traZeneca, Dai­ichi Sankyo un­cork new TNBC da­ta for 2nd part­nered ADC — and it's adding more heat un­der Gilead­'s Trodelvy

After the approval of their partnered anti-HER2 antibody-drug conjugate earlier this year, AstraZeneca and Daiichi Sankyo are riding high on the promise of their blooming partnership. Now a second ADC is showing promise in hard-to-treat breast cancer, and the companies have their eyes set on their only approved competitor in the space.

AstraZeneca and Daiichi Sankyo’s next-gen ADC datopotamab deruxtecan posted a 43% response rate and five confirmed complete or partial responses among 21 patients with triple-negative breast cancer, according to cohort data from the TROPION-PanTumor01 Phase I study presented Saturday at the virtual ESMO Breast annual meeting.

FDA ex­tends re­search agree­ment with MIT-li­censed or­gan-on-chip sys­tems

The FDA on Wednesday extended its four-year agreement with CN Bio, a developer of single- and multi-organ-on-chip systems used for drug discovery, for another three years.

CN Bio said the scope of the research performed by the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research has expanded to include the exploration of the company’s lung-on-a-chip system to help with the agency’s evaluation of inhaled drugs, in addition to the agency’s work on its liver model.

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In quest to meet user fee goals, FDA’s per­for­mance con­tin­ues down­ward trend

A recent update to the FDA’s running tally of how it’s meeting its user fee-related performance goals during the pandemic shows an agency that is not out of the woods yet.

The latest numbers reveal that for a second straight quarter in 2021, the FDA has met its user fee goal dates for 93% of original new drug applications, which compares with 94% and 98% for the previous two quarters in 2020, respectively.

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Joe Wiley, Amryt CEO

A biotech with a yen for pricey rare dis­ease drugs — and bar­gain base­ment shop­ping — adopts an­oth­er or­phan in lat­est M&A pact

After making it through a long, painful haul to get past a CRL and on to an FDA approval last summer, little Chiasma has found a buyer.

Amryt $AMYT, a company known for its appetite for acquiring expensive drugs for rare diseases at bargain prices, snagged Chiasma and its acromegaly drug Mycapssa (octreotide) capsules in an all-stock deal — with an exchange of 0.396 shares of Amryt for every share of Chiasma.