Park­er In­sti­tute backs an up­start biotech look­ing to de­vel­op a new, con­vert­ible CAR-T

The bil­lion­aire-backed Park­er In­sti­tute for Can­cer Im­munother­a­py is in­vest­ing and part­ner­ing with a biotech their re­searchers be­lieve has the po­ten­tial to de­vel­op a new-mod­el CAR-T that can be bet­ter guid­ed down nar­row path­ways and equipped with a con­ve­nient on/off switch to help avoid any fa­tal ac­ci­dents.

Jef­frey Blue­stone

Park­er CEO Jef­frey Blue­stone isn’t giv­ing away any num­bers right now, but he says the in­sti­tute’s eq­ui­ty in­vest­ment in Xyphos Bio­sciences “isn’t triv­ial.” The pri­ma­ry pur­pose of the in­vest­ment — and the re­search al­liance that plugs Xyphos in­to their net­work of promi­nent in­ves­ti­ga­tors — is to ac­cel­er­ate the work and pre­vent it from get­ting stuck in the R&D mud.

And I’m just get­ting start­ed with the car metaphors, so buck­le up.

What at­tract­ed Park­er to the Bay Area im­munother­a­py play­er?

Gen­er­al­ly speak­ing, it’s their work on con­vert­ible CAR-Ts, re­volv­ing around NKG2D re­cep­tors on sev­er­al cell types, in­clud­ing T cells and NK killer cells that have fas­ci­nat­ed the field. 

Us­ing their pro­tein en­gi­neer­ing tech, the com­pa­ny craft­ed the nat­ur­al NKG2D re­cep­tor to be in­ac­tive un­til it’s turned on by their bis­pe­cif­ic an­ti­body. One end of the bis­pe­cif­ic binds to the re­cep­tors on the con­vert­ible CAR-T, with the oth­er end de­signed to bind to the tar­get­ed ma­lig­nant cell. Their col­li­sion is in­tend­ed to crush the can­cer cell.

There are sev­er­al ad­van­tages to the ap­proach, Blue­stone tells me. The safe­ty as­pect is en­hanced by the “reg­u­lat­ed sys­tem” Xyphos is us­ing. “You’re con­trol­ling to T cells: You can stop en­gag­ing the tar­get” — and that off switch can be hit in the event of a sud­den cy­tokine storm that can en­gulf a pa­tient, a rou­tine threat for the pro­to­type CAR-Ts on the mar­ket.

These bis­pecifics can al­so tar­get a cell se­quen­tial­ly, shift­ing tar­gets when a pa­tient starts to de­vel­op re­sis­tance, com­mon­ly lead­ing to a re­lapse. And while the work is still pre­clin­i­cal, Park­er’s in­vest­ment is in­tend­ed to push the team to­ward the clin­ic.

If it pans out, says Blue­stone, they’ll have a best-in-class ther­a­py able to go af­ter a va­ri­ety of sol­id tu­mors.

Park­er has done a num­ber of re­search al­liances with bio­phar­mas like Tes­sa, but steered on­ly a few eq­ui­ty in­vest­ments like this. They’ve backed the on­col­o­gy imag­ing out­fit Imag­inAb and Tmu­ni­ty, the start­up from Penn’s Carl June and Oz Azam, and now Xyphos. There are al­so a few in­vest­ments they’ve made which they’re still play­ing close to the vest.

They’re in for the long haul, with some near-term des­ti­na­tions in mind.

Vas Narasimhan (Photographer: Jason Alden/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

No­var­tis de­tails plans to axe 8,000 staffers as Narasimhan be­gins sec­ond phase of a glob­al re­org

We now know the number of jobs coming under the axe at Novartis, and it isn’t small.

The pharma giant is confirming a report from Swiss newspaper Tages-Anzeiger that it is chopping 8,000 jobs out of its 108,000 global staffers. A large segment will hit right at company headquarters in Basel, as CEO Vas Narasimhan axes some 1,400 of a little more than 11,000  jobs in Switzerland.

The first phase of the work is almost done, the company says in a statement to Endpoints News. Now it’s on to phase two. In the statement, Novartis says:

Endpoints News

Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription

Unlock this story instantly and join 144,600+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free.

Scoop: Boehringer qui­et­ly shut­ters a PhII for one of its top drugs — now un­der re­view

Boehringer Ingelheim has quietly shut down a small Phase II study for one of its lead drugs.

The private pharma player confirmed to Endpoints News that it had shuttered a study testing spesolimab as a therapy for Crohn’s patients suffering from bowel obstructions.

A spokesperson for the company tells Endpoints:

Taking into consideration the current therapeutic landscape and ongoing clinical development programs, Boehringer Ingelheim decided to discontinue our program in Crohn’s disease. It is important to note that this decision is not based on any safety findings in the clinical trials.

Endpoints Premium

Premium subscription required

Unlock this article along with other benefits by subscribing to one of our paid plans.

Lina Gugucheva, NewAmsterdam Pharma CBO

Phar­ma group bets up to $1B-plus on the PhI­II res­ur­rec­tion of a once dead-and-buried LDL drug

Close to 5 years after then-Amgen R&D chief Sean Harper tamped the last spade of dirt on the last broadly focused CETP cholesterol drug — burying their $300 million upfront and the few remaining hopes for the class with it — the therapy has been fully resurrected. And today, the NewAmsterdam Pharma crew that did the Lazarus treatment on obicetrapib is taking another big step on the comeback trail with a €1 billion-plus regional licensing deal, complete with close to $150 million in upfront cash.

Endpoints News

Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription

Unlock this story instantly and join 144,600+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free.

How pre­pared is bio­phar­ma for the cy­ber dooms­day?

One of the largest cyberattacks in history happened on a Friday, Eric Perakslis distinctly remembers.

Perakslis, who was head of Takeda’s R&D Data Sciences Institute and visiting faculty at Harvard Medical School at the time, had spent that morning completing a review on cybersecurity for the British Medical Journal. Moments after he turned it in, he heard back from the editor: “Have you heard what’s going on right now?”

Endpoints Premium

Premium subscription required

Unlock this article along with other benefits by subscribing to one of our paid plans.

Scoop: Roche scraps one of two schiz­o­phre­nia PhII tri­als af­ter fail­ing the pri­ma­ry end­point

Roche has terminated one of two Phase II trials testing its drug ralmitaront in patients with schizophrenia, the Big Pharma confirmed to Endpoints News.

The study was terminated last month, according to a June 22 update to the registry on clinicaltrials.gov. Begun in September 2020, the trial was looking at ralmitaront in patients with acute schizophrenia. The trial enrolled 286 patients out of an originally planned 308.

Endpoints Premium

Premium subscription required

Unlock this article along with other benefits by subscribing to one of our paid plans.

Eliot Charles, MiroBio executive chairman

Ox­ford spin­out nabs al­most $100M in new cash to test PD-1 in au­toim­mune dis­eases and hunt for a CEO

After about 15 years in an Oxford lab and three more years in the upstart world following a 2019 spinout, MiroBio is ready to enter UK clinical trials and, en route to the clinic, the biotech has picked up $97 million in Series B funds.

The £80 million financing round kicked off in earnest last September and includes a transatlantic consortium — led by Medicxi — ready to bankroll that first clinical trial, beginning “imminently,” as well as the debut study of a second program thereafter, executive chair Eliot Charles, an SR One venture partner, told Endpoints News.

Deborah Dunsire, Lundbeck CEO

Af­ter a 5-year re­peat PhI­II so­journ, Lund­beck and Ot­su­ka say they're fi­nal­ly ready to pur­sue OK to use Rex­ul­ti against Alzheimer's ag­i­ta­tion

Five years after Lundbeck and their longtime collaborators at Otsuka turned up a mixed set of Phase III data for Rexulti as a treatment for Alzheimer’s dementia-related agitation, they’ve come through with a new pivotal trial success they believe will finally put them on the road to an approval at the FDA. And if they’re right, some analysts believe they’re a short step away from adding more than $500 million in annual sales for the drug, already approved in depression and schizophrenia.

Endpoints News

Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription

Unlock this story instantly and join 144,600+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free.

Chris Anzalone, Arrowhead CEO

Take­da, Ar­row­head spot­light da­ta from small tri­al show­ing RNAi works in a rare liv­er con­di­tion

Almost two years after Takeda wagered $300 million cash to partner with Arrowhead on an RNAi therapy for a rare disease, the companies are spelling out Phase II data that they believe put them one step closer to their big dreams.

In a small, open label study involving only 16 patients who had liver disease associated with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), Arrowhead’s candidate — fazirsiran, previously ARO-AAT — spurred substantial reductions in accumulated mutant AAT protein in the liver, a hallmark of the condition. Investigators also tracked improvements in symptoms, with seven out of 12 who received the high, 200 mg dose seeing regression of liver fibrosis.

Endpoints News

Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription

Unlock this story instantly and join 144,600+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free.

(AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe)

Some phar­ma com­pa­nies promise to cov­er abor­tion-re­lat­ed trav­el costs — while oth­ers won't go that far yet

As the US Department of Health and Human Services promises to support the millions of women who would now need to cross state lines to receive a legal abortion, a handful of pharma companies have said they will pick up employees’ travel expenses.

GSK, Sanofi, Johnson & Johnson, BeiGene, Alnylam and Gilead have all committed to covering abortion-related travel expenses just four days after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade and revoked women’s constitutional right to an abortion.

Endpoints News

Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription

Unlock this story instantly and join 144,600+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free.