Workforce

Round 2 in Boehringer’s US reorganization will claim another 244 jobs, including small molecule group

Boehringer Ingelheim is once again taking out its budget ax and hacking away jobs. Five months after the company told me that it was chopping 725 jobs out of its US structure, the German pharma company is hacking out another 244 positions, including 120 involved in small molecule discovery research in Connecticut and bringing the total to close to a thousand.

The rest of the cuts included 60 staffers in various functions with another 64 sales jobs being eliminated as well.

And just like last June, Boehringer styled these new cuts as a way for them to do their job in drug development even better, with fewer people.

As a company, Boehringer has no trouble drawing the curtains when it’s making changes. That tactic was employed just two months ago, when Boehringer announced that it was dropping a pact with South Korea’s Hanmi on the cancer drug olmutinib, without mentioning that the drug had been linked to severe toxicity. Korean officials had cited at least one death and two severe adverse events in studies of the drug. Another report cited by the political opposition said three patients had died.

Rumors about the latest layoffs were circulating this morning, and the news was first reported by In The Pipeline’s Derek Lowe.

Here’s the statement:

The actions we are taking now will help us reinvent the way we serve the needs of our patients, and enable us to continue to identify new medical breakthroughs.

In order to continue to deliver on our research strategy, we must create a leaner global Discovery Research organization by consolidating small molecule discovery to two sites in Biberach, Germany and Vienna, Austria. This decision will result in the closure of the small molecule discovery functions in Ridgefield, CT and Milan, Italy.

The creation of a leaner global Discovery Research organization will allow for increased investments in Oncology, with a focus on cancer immunology. The ability to modulate the body’s own immune system has opened new exciting ways to treat cancer. A new group will be formed, and led out of Ridgefield beginning in 2017 that will focus on cancer immunology discovery research. This new group will result in approximately 35 new positions in Connecticut.


The best place to read Endpoints News? In your inbox.

Full-text daily reports for those who discover, develop, and market drugs. Join 21,000+ biopharma pros who read Endpoints News by email every day.

Free Subscription

BioNJ CEO Summit 2017

Immuno Oncology 360