Dun Yang (Anticancer Bioscience)

A syn­thet­ic lethal­i­ty play­er emerges in Chi­na, armed with lessons on un­drug­gable onco­gene from No­bel lau­re­ate's lab

As a long­time post­doc in the UCSF lab of Michael Bish­op — the No­bel lau­re­ate known, among oth­er things, for cloning the onco­gene MYC — Dun Yang knew the can­cer tar­get like an archer knows the bulls­eye.

“I al­ways talk about if we need­ed to nom­i­nate the most im­por­tant onco­gene […] that should be MYC,” he told End­points News. “The sec­ond one would be RAS. Be­cause more than 50% of hu­man can­cer over­ex­press MYC onco­gene.”

All those years of re­search al­so gave him in­ti­mate knowl­edge about the pit­falls of try­ing to de­vel­op can­cer ther­a­pies around the MYC pro­tein. The con­sen­sus had been that MYC, a tran­scrip­tion fac­tor, is un­drug­gable; even if you some­how man­age to hit it, the po­ten­tial ben­e­fit would like­ly be off­set by the po­ten­tial side ef­fects that come with block­ing its es­sen­tial phys­i­o­log­i­cal func­tions.

So in 2010 — just as PARP in­hibitors were gain­ing trac­tion — he and sev­er­al oth­er sci­en­tists in the lab pro­posed some­thing new.

Thad­deus Allen

“A lot of peo­ple have of course heard of (Bish­op),” said Thad­deus Allen, whose tenure as a re­search sci­en­tist at UCSF over­lapped with Yang’s. “But I think what peo­ple don’t re­al­ize is the last 10 to 15 years of re­search that went on in Mike Bish­op’s lab was re­al­ly fo­cused on syn­thet­ic lethal­i­ty and re­al­ly Dun Yang was at the cen­ter of that re­search that was go­ing on.”

In­stead of tar­get­ing MYC di­rect­ly, they tried go­ing af­ter a ki­nase that tu­mors over­ex­press­ing MYC tend to re­ly on, and showed in mice that the com­pound they test­ed could kill can­cer cells while spar­ing nor­mal ones.

Yang would even­tu­al­ly leave San Fran­cis­co to re­turn to his home­town of Cheng­du, Chi­na, to start a can­cer re­search in­sti­tute epony­mous with Bish­op and see if he can go big­ger with that idea.

Now, more than a decade af­ter pub­lish­ing that pa­per, he’s se­cured a to­tal of $21 mil­lion from pri­vate Chi­nese in­vestors to build a com­pa­ny that doesn’t just stand shoul­der to shoul­der with US syn­thet­ic lethal­i­ty play­ers like Re­pare, Ar­tios, Cyteir and Ideaya, but some­day grow up to be the Genen­tech of Chi­na.

An­ti­cancer Bio­science is the de­vel­op­ment and com­mer­cial­iza­tion arm of the J. Michael Bish­op In­sti­tute of Can­cer Re­search, Yang said, and the 50 em­ploy­ees tech­ni­cal­ly work for both en­ti­ties. The team is spread across Chi­na, the US, the UK and In­dia — where the CEO re­cruit­ed his med­i­c­i­nal chemists.

With two drugs, one of them in MYC, poised to com­plete IND-en­abling stud­ies this year and en­ter the clin­ic in 2022, the biotech is busy jug­gling a to­tal of five pre­clin­i­cal pipeline pro­grams, which they say span the ar­eas of tu­mor sup­pres­sor syn­thet­ic lethal­i­ty, poly­ploid cell syn­thet­ic lethal­i­ty, cen­tro­some am­pli­fi­ca­tion/declus­ter­ing ther­a­py and restora­tion of con­tact in­hi­bi­tion.

Jing Zhang

Build­ing nov­el screen­ings — led by VP Jing Zhang in the UK — that ze­ro in on the right vul­ner­a­bil­i­ties that can be tar­get­ed are core to An­ti­cancer’s ex­per­tise, said Allen, the com­pa­ny’s VP of trans­la­tion­al bi­ol­o­gy. In ad­di­tion to screen­ing on syn­thet­ic li­braries, An­ti­cancer is al­so keen on find­ing com­pounds from na­ture li­braries — col­lec­tions of plant sam­ples from a province that Yang said ac­counts for 60% of the plant di­ver­si­ty in the coun­try.

“What’s new about our plat­form is we col­lect­ed from nov­el places,” added Allen, who’s al­so one of on­ly two staffers based in Cal­i­for­nia. “The com­pa­ny is in Cheng­du for a rea­son.”

“We have an un­matched nat­ur­al prod­ucts li­brary,” Yang wrote, “com­posed of over 17,500 crude ex­tracts, over 1,200 par­tial­ly pu­ri­fied frac­tions and around 2,500 pure nat­ur­al com­pounds. These sam­ples are made from over 2,600 plants, rep­re­sent­ing more than 1,500 plant species used in tra­di­tion­al Chi­nese med­i­cine.”

M&A: a crit­i­cal dri­ver for sus­tain­able top-line growth in health­care

2021 saw a record $600B in healthcare M&A activity. In 2022, there is an anticipated slowdown in activity, however, M&A prospects remain strong in the medium to long-term. What are future growth drivers for the healthcare sector? Where might we see innovations that drive M&A? RBC’s Andrew Callaway, Global Head, Healthcare Investment Banking discusses with Vito Sperduto, Global Co-Head, M&A.

15 LGBTQ lead­ers in bio­phar­ma; Paul Stof­fels’ Gala­pa­gos re­vamp; As­traZeneca catch­es up in AT­TR; and more

Welcome back to Endpoints Weekly, your review of the week’s top biopharma headlines. Want this in your inbox every Saturday morning? Current Endpoints readers can visit their reader profile to add Endpoints Weekly. New to Endpoints? Sign up here.

A return to in-person conferences also marks a return to on-the-ground reporting. My colleagues Beth Synder Bulik and Nicole DeFeudis were on-site at Cannes Lions, bringing live coverage of pharma’s presence at the ad festival — accompanied by photos from Clara Bui, our virtual producer, that bring you right to the scene. You can find a recap (and links to all the stories) below.

Endpoints News

Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription

Unlock this story instantly and join 144,300+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free.

AstraZeneca's new Evusheld direct to consumer campaign aims to reach more immunocompromised patients.

As­traZeneca de­buts first con­sumer cam­paign for its Covid-19 pro­phy­lac­tic Evusheld — and a first for EUA drugs

AstraZeneca’s first consumer ad for Evusheld is also a first for drugs that have been granted emergency use authorizations during the pandemic.

The first DTC ad for a medicine under emergency approval, the Evusheld campaign launching this week aims to raise awareness among immunocompromised patients — and spur more use.

Evusheld nabbed emergency authorization in December, however, despite millions of immunocompromised people looking for a solution and now more widespread availability of the drug.

Endpoints News

Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription

Unlock this story instantly and join 144,300+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free.

Yong Dai, Frontera Therapeutics CEO

Scoop: Lit­tle-known Or­biMed-backed biotech clos­es $160M round to start gene ther­a­py tri­al

Frontera Therapeutics, a China and US biotech, has closed a $160 million Series B and received regulatory clearance to test its first gene therapy stateside, Endpoints News has learned.

Led by the largest shareholder, OrbiMed, the biotech has secured $195 million total since its September 2019 founding, according to an email reviewed by Endpoints. The lead AAV gene therapy program is for an undisclosed rare eye disease, according to the source.

Endpoints News

Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription

Unlock this story instantly and join 144,300+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free.

De­spite a slow start to the year for deals, PwC pre­dicts a flur­ry of ac­tiv­i­ty com­ing up

Despite whispers of a busy year for M&A, deal activity in the pharma space is actually down 30% on a semi-annualized basis, according to PwC’s latest report on deal activity. But don’t rule out larger deals in the second half of the year, the consultants said.

PwC pharmaceutical and life sciences consulting solutions leader Glenn Hunzinger expects to see Big Pharma companies picking up earlier stage companies to try and fill pipeline gaps ahead of a slew of big patent cliffs. Though a bear market continues to maul the biotech sector, Hunzinger said recent deals indicate that pharma companies are still paying above current trading prices.

Abortion-rights protesters regroup and protest following Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe)

Fol­low­ing SCO­TUS de­ci­sion to over­turn abor­tion pro­tec­tions, AG Gar­land says states can't ban the abor­tion pill

Following the Supreme Court’s historic decision on Friday to overturn Americans’ constitutional right to an abortion after almost 50 years, Attorney General Merrick Garland sought to somewhat reassure women that states will not be able to ban the prescription drug sometimes used for abortions.

Following the decision, the New England Journal of Medicine also published an editorial strongly condemning the reversal, saying it “serves American families poorly, putting their health, safety, finances, and futures at risk.”

DEM BioPharma CEO David Donabedian (L) and executive chair Jan Skvarka

Long­wood sets an­oth­er 'don't eat me' biotech in­to gear with help of for­mer Tril­li­um CEO Jan Skvar­ka

Jonathan Weissman and team are out with a cancer-fighting biotech riding the appetite for those so-called “don’t eat me” and “eat me” signals.

The scientific co-founder — alongside fellow Whitehead Institute colleague Kipp Weiskopf and Stanford biologist Michael Bassik — has launched DEM BioPharma with incubator Longwood Fund and a crop of other investors.

In all, the nascent, 10-employee biotech has $70 million to bankroll hematology- and solid tumor-based programs, including a lead asset that could enter human trials in two to three years, CEO David Donabedian told Endpoints News.

Endpoints News

Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription

Unlock this story instantly and join 144,300+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free.

Spanish Prime Minister Pédro Sanchez and European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen (AP Photo/Geert Vanden Wijngaert)

EU to launch vac­cine de­vel­op­ment and man­u­fac­tur­ing part­ner­ship with Latin Amer­i­can and Caribbean coun­tries

While European companies, including BioNTech, are focused on increasing vaccine access to African countries by setting up vaccine manufacturing facilities, the European Union is looking westward to Latin America and the Caribbean.

Speaking at a press conference with Spanish Prime Minister Pédro Sanchez, EU Commission president Ursula von der Leyen said that the EU is launching a new initiative for vaccines and medicines manufacturing in Latin America, to get drugs to Latin America and the Caribbean faster.

invoX Pharma CEO Ben Toogood (L) and F-star CEO Eliot Forster

F-star bought out in $161M all-cash deal as Hong Kong's Sino Bio­pharm looks to­ward in­ter­na­tion­al ex­pan­sion

After more than a decade and a half of charting its own course, F-star Therapeutics will now settle under a new umbrella company.

The UK biotech will be acquired by invoX Pharma, a subsidiary of Hong Kong’s Sino Biopharm, in a roughly $161 million all-cash deal, the companies announced Thursday morning. F-star’s buyout will value its shares $FSTX at $7.12 apiece, nearly an 80% premium above Wednesday’s closing price.

Endpoints News

Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription

Unlock this story instantly and join 144,300+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free.