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FDA ap­proves Re­by­ota, Fer­ring's poop-based drug to fight C. diff in­fec­tion

The FDA approved Ferring Pharmaceuticals’ Rebyota drug on Wednesday, a poop-based drug implant that can prevent the recurrence of Clostridioides difficile infection.

While the use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) — replenishing a patient’s gut with bacteria from healthy feces — has already been happening without an FDA-approved product, Rebyota is the first live biotherapeutic drug approved by the agency to fight the potentially deadly infection.

Tim Van Hauwermeiren, argenx CEO

Ar­genx pur­chas­es $100M+ FDA pri­or­i­ty re­view vouch­er from blue­bird bio

Argenx’s Vyvgart is due for a speedy review at the FDA, thanks to a $102 million priority review voucher (PRV).

The Netherland-based biotech picked up the PRV from bluebird bio, the companies announced on Wednesday. PRVs shorten a drug’s FDA review period from 10 months to 6 months, though they often sell on the open market for around $100 million each.

Argenx plans on using the express ticket on efgartigimod, its neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) blocker marketed as Vyvgart for adults with generalized myasthenia gravis (gMG). While Vyvgart won its first approval last December for the chronic neuromuscular disease — which is characterized by difficulties with facial expression, speech, swallowing and breathing — CEO Tim Van Hauwermeiren said in a news release that he plans to “be active in fifteen disease targets by 2025.”

Lex­i­con slams FDA over hear­ing de­nial fol­low­ing a CRL for its SGLT2 in­hibitor can­di­date

Lexicon Pharmaceutical is not giving up on its Type I diabetes candidate, despite FDA’s repeated rejections. This week the company laid out is argument again for a hearing on sotagliflozin in response to the FDA’s most recent denial.

The issue goes back to March 2019 when the FDA made very clear to Lexicon and its now departed partner Sanofi that it would not approve their application for a potential Type I diabetes drug because it does not appear to be safe.

UK reg­u­la­tor warns of se­vere eye re­ac­tions fol­low­ing use of Sanofi and Re­gen­eron's Dupix­ent

The UK’s Medicines and Healthcare Regulatory Agency (MHRA) on Tuesday warned of some new and serious eye-related side effects following the use of Sanofi and Regeneron’s atopic dermatitis and asthma treatment Dupixent (dupilumab).

While Dupixent is already associated with cases of conjunctivitis and allergic conjunctivitis, dry eye and with infrequent cases of keratitis and ulcerative keratitis, the MHRA is calling on health professionals to be on the lookout for any of these eye-related side effects as “it is not currently possible to predict who may experience the rarer and most severe ocular adverse reactions, such as ulcerative keratitis.”

Vi­a­tris with­draws ac­cel­er­at­ed ap­proval for top­i­cal an­timi­cro­bial 24 years lat­er

After 24 years without confirming clinical benefit, the FDA announced Tuesday morning that Viatris (formed via Mylan and Pfizer’s Upjohn) has decided to withdraw a topical antimicrobial agent, Sulfamylon (mafenide acetate), after the company said conducting a confirmatory study was not feasible.

Sulfamylon first won FDA’s accelerated nod in 1998 as a topical burn treatment, with the FDA noting that last December, Mylan told the agency that it wasn’t running the trial.

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Scott Struthers, Crinetics CEO

FDA re­jects Cri­net­ic­s' cur­rent PhII de­sign for hy­per­in­sulin­ism drug

The FDA has put a stop to Crinetics’ plans for a Phase II trial on its congenital hyperinsulinism drug, the company announced Monday morning.

Last Tuesday, the FDA told the small molecule biotech over the phone that its proposed Phase II study was “not yet permitted to proceed,” and that the agency would give an explanation within the next 30 days.

The original Phase II plan was to study CRN04777, an oral somatostatin receptor type 5 (SST5) agonist, in children ages 3 months to 12 years. Crinetics submitted its IND for that study on Oct. 24. The company did not respond to a request for comment in time for publication.

Up­dat­ed: Roche pulls PD-L1 block­buster's ac­cel­er­at­ed ap­proval in blad­der can­cer

The FDA’s cleanup on aisle accelerated approval continued this morning as Roche announced it would voluntarily pull from the market an indication for its blockbuster cancer immunotherapy Tecentriq for adult patients with certain types of bladder or urinary tract cancer.

Roche unit Genentech said it made this decision following a failed confirmatory trial, and in accordance with the requirements of the FDA’s accelerated approval program, which has been in revamp mode, particularly in oncology, where many accelerated approvals have been granted in recent years.

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In­dus­try groups, CVS pick apart FDA's pro­posed path­way for gener­ics to carve out OTC in­di­ca­tions

Pharma industry groups like the Association for Accessible Medicines (AAM) and PhRMA are raising pointed questions about an FDA plan to create a new pathway for marketing prescription drugs with an additional condition for nonprescription use (ACNU), which would require more safeguards than the current OTC pathway but essentially carve out new OTC uses for some generic drugs.

Chief among the concerns were: Insurance companies dropping coverage for the Rx version, new ACNU patents to block competition, and industry essentially governing the pathway.

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Robert Califf, FDA commissioner (Jose Luis Magana/AP Images)

Fourth ac­cel­er­at­ed ap­proval in Duchenne? Sarep­ta gets pri­or­i­ty re­view for gene ther­a­py amid FDA scruti­ny

Sarepta is once again on the accelerated approval path for a Duchenne drug, picking up a priority review Monday morning.

The FDA granted the accelerated review to SRP-9001, Sarepta announced Monday, which would become the biotech’s fourth Duchenne drug if approved. Much like SRP-9001 will do, each of the previous three therapies went through the accelerated approval pathway. But unlike the others, SRP-9001 is a gene therapy.

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Tom Riga, Spectrum Pharmaceuticals CEO

Spec­trum im­plodes af­ter a harsh pub­lic slap­down and now a CRL from Richard Paz­dur

The FDA has gone out of its way several times to flatten any expectations for Spectrum’s lung cancer drug poziotinib, including slamming the regulatory door in the biotech’s face four years ago when the their executive crew came calling for a breakthrough drug designation and encouragement from the oncology wing of the FDA.

That stinging early rebuke pointed straight down the path to a corrosive in-house agency review of Spectrum’s attempt to land an accelerated approval for the oral EGFR TKI and a public whipping that included a classic takedown by none other than Richard Pazdur, who slammed the company for “poor drug development” that led to confusion over the dose needed for a slice of NSCLC patients harboring HER2 exon 20 insertion mutations.

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