R&D channel feed

Look­ing to win over some skep­ti­cal an­a­lysts, Rhythm beats the drum on in­ter­im da­ta in PhII bas­ket study for ad­di­tion­al in­di­ca­tions

Rhythm Pharmaceuticals has been working toward expanding the FDA approval they received just two months ago for three rare genetic disorders that result in obesity. In December, their Phase III cut of data saw mixed reactions from analysts, but new interim results released Tuesday may provide more excitement.

In an ongoing Phase II study for setmelanotide across individuals with one of three distinct rare genetic diseases of obesity, 65 patients had reached the Dec. 17 cutoff date for evaluation. Among patients who met the primary endpoint of at least 5% weight loss over three months, Rhythm saw an average reduction of no less than 7.1% in any of the groups.

George Yancopoulos (L) and Len Schleifer (Regeneron)

Re­gen­eron touts pos­i­tive pre­lim­i­nary im­pact of its Covid an­ti­body cock­tail, pre­vent­ing symp­to­matic in­fec­tions in high-risk group

Regeneron flipped its cards on an interim analysis of the data being collected for its Covid-19 antibody cocktail used as a safeguard against exposure to the virus. And the results are distinctly positive.

The big biotech reported Tuesday morning that their casirivimab and imdevimab combo prevented any symptomatic infections from occurring in a group of 186 people exposed to the virus through a family connection, while the placebo arm saw 8 of 223 people experience symptomatic infection. Symptomatic combined with asymptomatic infections occurred in 23 people among the 223 placebo patients compared to 10 of the 186 subjects in the cocktail arm.

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José Baselga, AstraZeneca cancer chief (Brent N. Clarke/FilmMagic via Getty Images)

As­traZeneca's Calquence nabs an­oth­er win against Im­bru­vi­ca, but Eli Lil­ly is on its heels

Three years after first launching Calquence as a second generation BTK inhibitor, AstraZeneca continues to tout new data to compete with J&J and AbbVie’s first generation blockbuster Imbruvica.

The British pharma announced on Monday that Calquence passed a head-to-head Phase III study against Imbruvica in chronic lymphocytic leukemia, proving non-inferior — i.e. just as good — as the older drug. Although AstraZeneca did not break down any of the numbers, they said the drug proved superior on safety, triggering fewer cases of atrial fibrillation, an irregular heartbeat that can lead to stroke or heart failure.

Roche amps up its bis­pe­cif­ic at­tack on Eylea with more PhI­II da­ta — but just how threat­en­ing is it?

Roche has another stack of data to back up its longer-acting challenger to Eylea — although it’s still far from certain just how much they can threaten Regeneron’s dominance.

The latest Phase III results come from two trials that enrolled 1,329 patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration. With 45% of people in both studies getting faricimab 16 weeks apart during the first year, the bispecific still induced the same level of gains in visual acuity as Eylea every 8 weeks did, Roche’s Genentech reported.

Fast on Glax­o­SmithK­line's heels, Au­rinia wins OK to steer a sec­ond lu­pus nephri­tis drug straight to the mar­ket

GlaxoSmithKline’s Benlysta isn’t alone in the small circle of approved lupus nephritis drugs anymore.

Little Aurinia Pharmaceuticals has gotten the green light from the FDA to start marketing its first and only program, voclosporin, under the brand name Lupkynis — something CEO Peter Greenleaf says it’s been ready to do since December.

Regulators went right down to the wire on the decision, keeping the company and the entire salesforce it’s already assembled on its toes.

Hal Barron, GSK via YouTube

What does $29B buy you in Big Phar­ma? In Glax­o­SmithK­line’s case, a whole lot of un­com­fort­able ques­tions about the pipeline

Talk about your bad timing.

A little over a week ago, GSK R&D chief Hal Barron marked his third anniversary at the research helm by taking a turn at the virtual podium during JP Morgan to make the case that he and his team had built a valuable late-stage pipeline capable of churning out more than 10 blockbusters in the next 5 years.

And then, just days later, one of the cancer drugs he bet big on as a top prospect — bintrafusp, partnered with Merck KGaA — failed its first pivotal test in non-small cell lung cancer.

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Glax­o­SmithK­line scraps a LAG3 study, mark­ing an­oth­er fail­ure for the pipeline af­ter a crit­i­cal set­back

Another gap has appeared in GlaxoSmithKline’s pipeline.

Friday morning the Australian biotech Immutep put out word that Hal Barron’s R&D group at GSK had decided to scrap a Phase II proof-of-concept study in ulcerative colitis for their anti-LAG3 therapy GSK2831781. According to the biotech, the program didn’t survive an interim review.

The trial was stopped by GSK based on the assessment of clinical data as part of a planned interim analysis conducted in consultation with the trial’s Data Review Committee. GSK is conducting further reporting, assessment and analyses of the efficacy and safety data and evaluating the biology to determine next steps for the GSK2831781 development program.

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Kevin Boyle, Kuur

Months af­ter a ma­jor re­brand­ing around CAR-NKT cells, Ku­ur Ther­a­peu­tics is of­fer­ing a peek at ear­ly re­sults

Several months after a name change and major restructuring, Kuur Therapeutics has offered an early glimpse at results from a small number of patients treated with their CAR-NKT cell therapies developed with the Baylor College of Medicine.

Out of 10 evaluable neuroblastoma patients dosed with Kuur’s lead candidate, an autologous GD2-targeting CAR-NKT therapy, researchers noted one complete response, one partial response, and three patients with stable disease, according to the Houston-based biotech.

Eli Lil­ly's an­ti­body cuts risk of Covid-19 by up to 80% among the most vul­ner­a­ble — but will it have a place next to vac­cines?

Eli Lilly says bamlanivimab lowered the risk of contracting symptomatic Covid-19 in a first-of-its-kind trial involving nursing home residents and staff, paving the way for a new option to protect against the virus.

But how big of an impact it might have, and what role it will play, at a time vaccines are being rolled out to the exact population it is targeting still remains unclear.

For its part, Lilly sees the antibody serving as one of a “diverse set of approaches” that can help certain populations who either choose not to or aren’t able to get vaccinated. Or they don’t have a robust response to a vaccine.

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With patent con­cerns loom­ing, Roche gets a new pri­or­i­ty re­view on block­buster IPF drug

Seven years after the FDA first approved Esbriet, the blockbuster Roche IPF drug is getting an expedited review for a second indication.

On Thursday, the agency gave Esbriet priority review for unclassified interstitial lung diseases, or forms of pulmonary inflammation and scarring that don’t fit easily into the over 200 known types of ILD. The move comes 10 months after Esbriet received breakthrough designation and sets Roche up for a decision by May.