Alzheon hits an­oth­er dead end fund­ing its Alzheimer's pro­gram, pulls sec­ond IPO at­tempt

If at first you don’t suc­ceed… maybe it wasn’t such a good idea.

Alzheon has learned that the hard way as it with­draws its IPO for a sec­ond time, de­spite dras­ti­cal­ly down­siz­ing the of­fer­ing and ad­just­ing its goal from a Phase III piv­otal study to a Phase IIb for its lead drug.

Mar­tin To­lar

That wasn’t enough to woo in­vestors in­to back­ing its ul­tra-risky project of turn­ing a once-failed drug for Alzheimer’s, at a time the hu­mil­i­at­ing flop at Ax­o­vant — which es­sen­tial­ly pur­sued the same strat­e­gy — still haunts its stock.

It doesn’t help Alzheon’s odds that its pur­su­ing the amy­loid be­ta hy­poth­e­sis, which has de­feat­ed every drug thrown at it so far in a piv­otal study. Hav­ing li­censed the drug, now dubbed ALZ-801, from Mon­tre­al-based Bel­lus Health (for­mer­ly Neu­rochem) back in 2013, Alzheon made some tweaks to the once-dai­ly pill that the com­pa­ny hopes will get the drug to its tar­get more quick­ly while re­duc­ing side ef­fects in the gut.

Back in 2016, Alzheon’s CEO Mar­tin To­lar told End­points News the com­pa­ny would need more like $100 mil­lion to pay for two Phase III stud­ies for the lead drug — sub­stan­tial­ly less than what oth­er late-stage Alzheimer’s pro­grams would cost, he ar­gued, be­cause it’s tar­get­ing “pa­tients known to have risk fac­tors for amy­loid pathol­o­gy.” Un­der that plan, for­mu­lat­ed based on a post doc analy­sis, Alzheon would on­ly need to re­cruit 500 pa­tients each for its two Phase III tri­als, fo­cus­ing on a ge­net­i­cal­ly-de­fined AD pop­u­la­tion of APOE4/4 ho­mozy­gotes.

It first filed for an $80 mil­lion IPO in March 2018, on­ly to step back from it a month lat­er. The sec­ond at­tempt was launched in last Au­gust, eye­ing $30 mil­lion in pro­ceeds. At that point, ac­cord­ing to the S-1, it was run­ning on a lit­tle more than $3 mil­lion in cash and cash equiv­a­lents.

2023 Spot­light on the Fu­ture of Drug De­vel­op­ment for Small and Mid-Sized Biotechs

In the context of today’s global economic environment, there is an increasing need to work smarter, faster and leaner across all facets of the life sciences industry.  This is particularly true for small and mid-sized biotech companies, many of which are facing declining valuations and competing for increasingly limited funding to propel their science forward.  It is important to recognize that within this framework, many of these smaller companies already find themselves resource-challenged to design and manage clinical studies themselves because they don’t have large teams or in-house experts in navigating the various aspects of the drug development journey. This can be particularly challenging for the most complex and difficult to treat diseases where no previous pathway exists and patients are urgently awaiting breakthroughs.

Gossamer Bio CEO Faheem Hasnain at Endpoints' #BIO22 panel (J.T. MacMillan Photography for Endpoints News)

Gos­samer’s Fa­heem Has­nain de­fends a round of pos­i­tive PAH da­ta as a clear win. But can these PhII re­sults stand up to scruti­ny?

Gossamer Bio $GOSS posted a statistically significant improvement for its primary endpoint in the key Phase II TORREY trial for lead drug seralutinib on Tuesday morning. But CEO Faheem Hasnain has some explaining to do on the important secondary of the crucial six-minute walk distance test — which will be the primary endpoint in Phase III — as the data on both endpoints fell short of expectations, missing one analyst’s bar on even modest success.

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Kristen Hege, Bristol Myers Squibb SVP, early clinical development, oncology/hematology and cell therapy (Illustration: Assistant Editor Kathy Wong for Endpoints News)

Q&A: Bris­tol My­er­s' Kris­ten Hege on cell ther­a­py, can­cer pa­tients and men­tor­ing the next gen­er­a­tion

Kristen Hege leads Bristol Myers Squibb’s early oncology discovery program carrying on from the same work at Celgene, which was acquired by BMS in 2019. She’s known for her early work in CAR-T, having pioneered the first CAR-T cell trial for solid tumors more than 25 years ago.

However, the eminent physician-scientist is more than just a drug developer mastermind. She’s also a practicing physician, mother to two young women, an avid backpacker and intersecting all those interests — a champion of young women and people of color in STEM and life sciences.

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Eisai and METAvivor plan to debut the latest 'This is MBC' campaign at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS).

Ei­sai re-ups metasta­t­ic breast can­cer aware­ness cam­paign with strik­ing pa­tient pho­tographs

Eisai is debuting the newest ads in its long-running “This is MBC” campaign this week. In what’s become an annual tradition, Eisai and metastatic breast cancer advocacy partner METAvivor will show the striking photographs of people living with metastatic breast cancer first at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS).

The new “Imagine” campaign features 12 patients photographed around waterfalls to symbolize that same kind of sudden drop into a pool that MBC causes in a person’s life, said Beth Fairchild, co-founder of #CancerCulture who was the president of METAvivor six years ago when the campaign began. Fairchild, who is living with MBC, has helped create all of the annual “This is MBC” campaigns.

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Pfiz­er and BioN­Tech look to toss Mod­er­na patent suit, call­ing claims 'unen­force­able'

Pfizer and BioNTech took a swing at Moderna’s Covid-19 patent claims in Massachusetts federal court on Monday, calling them “invalid,” “overbroad” and “unenforceable.”

The defendants also filed counterclaims against the Cambridge, MA-based biotech, seeking a dismissal of the case, recovery of court fees and an official judgment invalidating Moderna’s claims.

Moderna sued Pfizer and BioNTech back in August, alleging that the partners’ Covid-19 vaccine Comirnaty copied parts of Moderna’s vaccine technology patented before the pandemic, when it was developing an mRNA vaccine for MERS, another respiratory illness.

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Rick Modi, Affinia Therapeutics CEO

Ver­tex-part­nered gene ther­a­py biotech Affinia scraps IPO plans

Affinia Therapeutics has ditched its plans to go public in a relatively closed-door market that has not favored Nasdaq debuts for the drug development industry most of this year. A pandemic surge in 2020 and 2021 opened the doors for many preclinical startups, which caught Affinia’s attention and gave the gene therapy biotech confidence in the beginning days of 2022 to send in its S-1.

But on Friday, Affinia threw in the S-1 towel and concluded now is not the time to step onto Wall Street. The biotech has put out few public announcements since the spring of this year. Endpoints News picked the startup as one of its 11 biotechs to watch last year.

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US sup­ports ex­ten­sion for Covid-19 IP waiv­er de­ci­sion

After much debate, the US government is now calling for a deadline extension to discuss a controversial potential IP waiver for Covid-19 diagnostics and therapeutics.

Over the last five months, the Office of the United States Trade Representative said it has consulted with members of Congress, public health advocates, organized labor groups, academics, think tanks, companies and trade associations on the WTO’s recent TRIPS agreement, which established a 5-year waiver of certain patent requirements on Covid-19 vaccines.

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Bob Duggan, Summit Therapeutics co-CEO

Bounc­ing from ma­jor set­back, Sum­mit hands out $500M cash for can­cer drug — thanks to a loan from bil­lion­aire CEO

After hitting a dead end with Summit Therapeutics’ lead program, Bob Duggan has found the drug that he believes will usher into a compelling second act. So compelling, in fact, that it involves $500 million cash — and he’s taking money out of his own pocket to fund the deal.

Striking a partnership with Akeso Therapeutics out of China, Summit is bringing in a bispecific antibody that blocks both PD-1 and VEGF called ivonescimab. Akeso, which has a PD-1/CTLA-4 bispecific approved in China, has already taken ivonescimab into multiple clinical trials, including a Phase III in lung cancer.

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Glen­mark hit with warn­ing let­ter over pro­ce­dures, qual­i­ty con­trol is­sues at In­dia man­u­fac­tur­ing plant

The generics producer Glenmark Pharmaceuticals has been handed a warning letter by US regulators.

The letter, which was sent to the manufacturer on Nov. 22, noted issues from an inspection over the summer at Glenmark’s facility in the town of Colvale, India, in the state of Goa.

According to the letter, the FDA found that Glenmark’s investigation of rejected batches of drugs “failed to extend to other batches, dosage strengths, and drug products.” The warning letter also noted that the site had failed to establish “adequate written procedures” for production and process control to ensure drugs have the correct strength, quality and purity.