These 300(+) Biotech Twit­ter cit­i­zens are the quick­est to tweet news


Like many of you, I have a com­pli­cat­ed re­la­tion­ship with Twit­ter. I don’t feel good at it, but here I am ob­sess­ing over it. I re­sent feel­ing like I need to be good at it. That’s a bad way to feel about a re­la­tion­ship you’ve been in for sev­en years.

Your friends have more friends than you do — this is the rub of so­cial net­work­ing. There isn’t a pro­fes­sion­al I know who is proud of the small size of their Rolodex. It’s no won­der so many in bio­phar­ma join Twit­ter on­ly to aban­don it af­ter a few tweets. The de­fault state of their new ac­count ad­ver­tis­es to the world that no­body at all fol­lows what you have to say. That doesn’t feel good ei­ther.

If you work in­side bio­phar­ma, I’ll ad­mit there’s not much rea­son for you to post to Twit­ter. Yes, there are ex­cep­tions and many en­joy a rich­er ca­reer as a re­sult. But it’s not true for a big ma­jor­i­ty. Most knowl­edge in bio­phar­ma is held in the minds and ex­pe­ri­ences of peo­ple and com­pa­nies. These are not shared in pub­lic.

The beau­ty of Twit­ter is that you don’t have to say any­thing at all.

Read-on­ly Twit­ter

The dirty se­cret of Twit­ter is that it’s de­pen­dent on jour­nal­ists and pro­fes­sion­al con­tent-cre­ators. We go to Face­book to see time­lines of our friends and fam­i­ly. LinkedIn time­lines on­ly mat­ter if you’re on a job hunt or re­cruit­ing peo­ple your­self.

Se­ri­ous news hounds turn to Twit­ter be­cause it’s the on­ly se­ri­ous place to craft a hard news time­line. And it turns out “read-on­ly Twit­ter” is quite an amaz­ing prod­uct. When you tune in­to the con­ver­sa­tions of oth­ers, you learn things you didn’t know you need­ed to know.

Jour­nal­ists, brands, and bots all rush to post con­tent the mo­ment it’s fit for con­sump­tion. Some links have legs, oth­ers don’t. It’s an op­er­at­ing sys­tem for the dis­sem­i­na­tion of news and the meta-com­men­tary that fol­lows. This is the top of the pub­lic in­fo pyra­mid. From here these things fil­ter down­stream to the 80% of the in­dus­try who have no re­la­tion­ship with Twit­ter.

Plug­ging your ear in­to the top of this nerve cen­ter gets you clos­er and faster to this in­for­ma­tion. Whether this in­for­ma­tion is good or bad, that’s for you to de­cide. Like the tele­phone game, where you tell some­one some­thing and it changes down­stream, your in­for­ma­tion is pur­er the clos­er it was to the sig­nal. It’s with­out the col­or. No ana­log degra­da­tion.

Too much noise

Hav­ing asym­met­ric in­for­ma­tion is a huge ad­van­tage in busi­ness, right? You know some­thing some­body else doesn’t, and they don’t have ac­cess to those bit of in­fo. This is how it worked in 1990.

In 2016 you can pos­sess asym­met­ric in­for­ma­tion that’s freely avail­able to all, but was lost in the dig­i­tal ether of tweets, press re­leas­es, al­go­spam, and Na­tive Ӓd­ver­tis­ing. In­for­ma­tion is eas­i­ly buried in the con­tent swamp. You just can’t see it all.

Now there’s plen­ty of firms who’ll charge a $10,000 month­ly re­tain­er to sift through these tweets, trav­el ob­scure parts of the web, trav­el be­hind the pay­walls, send you a sum­ma­ry, make sure things don’t fall through the cracks. A few lucky bio­phar­ma ex­ec­u­tives en­joy these perks.

What if you’re brand new to bio­phar­ma? How about if you’re a sea­soned vet but just new to Twit­ter? How do you know who to fol­low? Twit­ter for all in­tents and pur­pos­es is a con­sumer brand. De­spite it be­ing a rich, im­me­di­ate source of in­for­ma­tion for drug de­vel­op­ers, Twit­ter the com­pa­ny has no prod­ucts to on­board such a niche au­di­ence.

We love Twit­ter at End­points and want more peo­ple in bio­phar­ma to en­joy the ben­e­fits of it — even as a pro­fes­sion­al lurk­er.

In­tro­duc­ing Mar­co, our news­bot

Last Au­gust we qui­et­ly launched our vi­ral news­bot@endpts. We re­cent­ly named it Mar­co — con­stant­ly ex­plor­ing BioTwit­ter.

It’s job is to:

  • Search for links in every tweet made in a known uni­verse of thou­sands of BioTwit­ter ac­counts;
  • Cal­cu­late the ve­loc­i­ty of each link shared;
  • If a link starts mov­ing much faster rel­a­tive to oth­er links, it’s now trend­ing;
    • Mar­co then vis­its the link it­self and ex­tracts the head­line, au­thor, and source. We want our own, in­de­pen­dent in­for­ma­tion about the link.
  • Mar­co then tweets the link. It gives cred­it with a hat tip [h/t] to the ac­count that it saw tweet the link first.

It’s that last part that forms the ba­sis of this spe­cial re­port: who was the first per­son to re­port this news?

Mar­co has been read­ing BioTwit­ter 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for al­most a a year now. Over this time we can ag­gre­gate the hat tips Mar­co doled out and come up with this ex­act list.

We guar­an­tee if you fol­low a healthy seg­ment of this list — you’re plugged in­to to heart of the link econ­o­my on BioTwit­ter.

What this list is not

Any­time you rank your friends and col­leagues there’s bound to be hard feel­ings. So let me state for the record:

  • This is not a list of the best ac­counts to fol­low in BioTwit­ter. Many tweeps nev­er post links and in­stead con­tribute with con­text and analy­sis. Mar­co is a few tech­no­log­i­cal rev­o­lu­tions away from be­ing able to un­der­stand when some­one is be­ing sar­cas­tic or help­ful, so it ig­nores text-on­ly tweets. And that’s of­ten the best part of Twit­ter.
  • This is not a who’s who list. There are plen­ty of those around and none of them do any­thing for the per­son who sim­ply wants to be the best pro­fes­sion­al lurk­er on BioTwit­ter.
  • There are no val­ue judge­ments here. This is a pure­ly da­ta-dri­ven list. Yes, it’s our own pro­pri­ety da­ta and I’m not like­ly to di­vulge the ex­act man­ner in which we re­duce the fire­hose of BioTwit­ter in­to a trick­le. But we’re pre­sent­ing the da­ta as-is.


Biotech Twit­ter cit­i­zens most fre­quent­ly cred­it­ed with post­ing trend­ing links first

Over 100 hat tips
John­Cendpts
Fierce­Biotech
Bio­S­tocks
brad­lon­car
Andy­Biotech
adamfeuer­stein
matthe­wher­p­er
phar­malot
Er­ic­Topol
Ben­the­Fi­dler
Fier­cePhar­ma

 

50 – 99 hat tips
Derek­lowe
megtir­rell
Ja­cob­Pli­eth
Mav­er­ick­NY
cru­sadernz
Scrip­Don­naDC
Bos­Biz­Don
ld­tim­mer­man
busi­ness
jonathanrock­off
Reuters_Health
3NT
CGrantWSJ
ste­faniei
LifeSciVC

 

20 – 49 hat tips
Arm­strong­Drew
BioRunUp
reuters­Ben­Hir
Biotech­World
John_LaMat­ti­na
Na­ture­News
car­dio­brief
Lof­tus
an­to­niore­gal­a­do
Jean­neWhalen
ivanoran­sky
Zachary­Bren­nan
Car­o­lineYLChen
AKAarsalan
Emi­ly­W­Fierce
DShay­witz
Black­Swan­Phar­ma
Wrigley­Tom
kris­ten_hal­lam
GideonGil
Bio­DueDili­gence
Reuters­Biz
Car­ly­H­Fierce
WSJbusi­ness
phar­magos­sip
TST­biotech
jq1234t
scrip­news
ZTrac­er
alexlash
ar­lenewein­traub
IPOtweet
WS­JA­sia
bio_clouse­au
FDALawyers
NPRHealth
ByJon­Gard­ner
charlesorn­stein
FDAad­comm
cafephar­ma
PDRen­nert
WSJ
lisam­jarvis
edy­ong209
NE­JM
ju­liaoftoron­to
rplenge
denis­eroland
lo­mu_j

 

At least 10 hat tips
techre­view
Boston­Globe
Reuters
pk­noepfler
WSJhealth
Lau­ra­LandroWSJ
porte­feuille­fun
El­y­se­Tanouye
sdbn
an­drew_ward1
TomBur­ton­WSJ
Ac­tivist­Shorts
Fay­Cortez
Biotech­News
dg­macarthur
dr­bachin­sky
Na­ture­Biotech
zbiotech
cells_nnm
Fes­tivus159
iito­Life­Science
skathire
medtech_ma
US_FDA
genen­tech
DewDili­gence
RNA­i­An­a­lyst
cray­ton_h
FT
vox­dot­com
Scrip­Mandy
car­lz­im­mer
vir­gini­ahugh­es
dhovekamp42
Alec­Gaffney
NYTHealth
PhilSer­afi­no
hmkyale
steveus­din1
fdalaw­blog
The­At­lantic
Scot­tKirsner
IAmBiotech
stem­cel­las­says
TheStal­wart
Trade­Hawk
Bio­Break­out
an­naed­ney
politi­co
ddi­a­mond
sxbe­gle
Frank_S_David
CMichael­Gib­son
Mogu­lAzam
Dr­MiguelPerales
ScripEleanor
Bio­Cen­tu­ry
brentl­saun­ders
rleu­ty_biotech
michael_mezher
ProP­ub­li­ca
rick­berke
Gan­tosJ
Dan­Bud­wick
Phar­ma­ceu­ticBen
FierceMed­Dev
sci­en­tre
srq­s­tock­pick­er
CN­BC

 

At least 4 hat tips
joe­walk­er­WSJ
ethanjweiss
23alo­ha
forbeshealth
GlobeR­obW
EMA_News
sci­ences­can­ner
Ope­nOut­crier
Mike­Huck­man
big3bio­BOS
davies­bj
Mer­ck
mt­md­phd
Drchik23
Med­ical­News
SA_Health­In­vest
db­sable
dan­pri­mack
an­naw­math­ews
guardian­science
Med­ical­New­sUSA
taralach
eval­u­atephar­ma
Ram­sey_Bagh­da­di
westr
ze­ro­hedge
Liq­uid_Biop­sy
Lin_ling_88
dsobek
Ai­ims1742
DrAD­Kline
JNapo­dano
BioWorld
LizSz­abo
BI_Sci­ence
TechCrunch
US­ATO­DAY
not­So­JunkD­NA
ideaphar­ma
Mar­tin­Shkre­li
Evavon­Schaper
mau­reen­m­far­rell
Car­olynyjohn­son
BioTerp
cb­tad­vi­sors
bm­snews
Al­ny­lam
at­ti­cusMB
fund­Duchenne
SashaDamouni
Tim­mer­man­Re­port
bbchealth
bmj_lat­est
Fier­cePhar­mA­sia
biotech­day
FDA_Drug_In­fo
Prop­Thinker
No­var­tis­S­cience
matt_levine
blsuth
FDA­Me­dia
News­from­Science
Sud­han­vaRaj
FiveThir­tyEight
vlad33301
dami­an­garde
BlinkX90
sandiego­science
Mykalt45
Adam­Singer
ScottGot­tlieb­MD
Don­WNi­chol­son
Grady­For­rer
AS­CO
Davi­dAStein­berg
RPM­Re­port­Mike
sloan_ket­ter­ing
Hum­bleBio­Trad­er
JA­MA_cur­rent
Chillz­Trad­ing
SueD­Hell­mann
jay­brad­ner
daph­ne­zo­har
Vikas­Dan­dekarET
cd­weaver
bh­munos
SIRF_Re­port
mslopat­to
michaelscal­ly
michael_gilman
Dougal­lan1
prince­tongb
Drug­Patent­Watch
chris­sy­farr
Za­ck­foot
ma­ki_ki­ta­mu­ra
jfli­er
Life­SciencesMkt
wilbanks
He­len­Bran­swell
afrakt
rt­narch
Ogut_Ozgur
aman­dam­ick­lus
walidgel­lad
smhedge­cock
iBo­nanos
PearlF
jtozz
maryn­m­ck
Dr­Jen­Gunter
Boston_Biotech
broad­in­sti­tute
ES­chat­tner
pi­car­don­health
ScripLu­cie
can­cer­doc­NYC
Xcon­o­my
No­var­tis
hrana
BioWriter­Chik
Nick­PaulTay­lor
WHO
phar­ma­con­nect
myger­sh­berg
gau­tamkol­lu
An­a­lyst­Wire
Econ­SciTech
EP­Clin­i­cal­Tri­al
Bio­Med­Track­er
pe­ter­bach­md
Caulfield­Tim
Mar­i­lyn­Mann
John_Hemp­ton
mbeisen
John­PLeonard­MD
charles_ga­ba
aleszuba­jak
Black­Hawk­Trad­er
JCM­c­Crack­en
Break­ingNews
jodi­gral­nick
eye­onf­da
Robert­Langreth
berna­tolle
cel­lec­tis
Kathy­Giusti
RS_Flinn
Arthur­Ca­plan
bertha­coombs
Lym­phoma_Doc
aaronecar­roll
NIH
NYTScience
Street_In­sid­er
David­Ju­urlink
Na­tRevDrugDisc
ac­taest­fab­u­laXX
23Chromz
EP­Van­tage
Fast­Com­pa­ny
Mau­riceOn­TW
An­nemarieVtW
biotech­baumer
ewan­bir­ney
Jack­West­MD
On­col­o­gy­Times
at­lasven­ture
JPZaragoza1
BioWino
RNA_Biotech
John­Tuck­er­PhD
Col­fax­Cap­i­tal
si­mon­bay­ly
NBC­New­sHealth
fw­phar­ma
In­natePhar­ma
Er­icP­Fierce
thinkgenome
AC­In­vestor­Blog
AlpineBV_Miller
HaertlG
Scrip­Mike­Ward
Roche
at­ul­butte
Na­tureMed­i­cine

What Will it Take to Re­al­ize the Promise and Po­ten­tial of Im­mune Cell Ther­a­pies?

What does it take to get to the finish line with a new cancer therapy – fast? With approvals in place and hundreds of immune cell therapy candidates in the pipeline, the global industry is poised to create a fundamental shift in cancer treatments towards precision medicine. At the same time, unique challenges associated with cell and process complexity present manufacturing bottlenecks that delay speed to market and heighten cost of goods sold (COGS) — these hurdles must be overcome to make precision treatments an option for every cancer patient. This series of articles highlights some of the key manufacturing challenges associated with the production of cell-based cancer therapies as well as the solutions needed to transcend them. Automation, process knowledge, scalability, and assured supply of high-quality starting material and reagents are all critical to realizing the full potential of CAR-based therapies and sustaining the momentum achieved in recent years. The articles will highlight leading-edge technologies that incorporate these features to integrate across workflows, accelerate timelines and reduce COGS – along with how these approaches are enabling the biopharmaceutical industry to cross the finish line faster with new treatment options for patients in need.

The biggest ques­tions fac­ing gene ther­a­py, the XLMTM com­mu­ni­ty, and Astel­las af­ter fourth pa­tient death

After three patients died last year in an Astellas gene therapy trial, the company halted the study and began figuring out how to safely get the program back on track. They would, executives eventually explained, cut the dose by more than half and institute a battery of other measures to try to prevent the same thing from happening again.

Then tragically, Astellas announced this week that the first patient to receive the new regimen had died, just weeks after administration.

Endpoints Premium

Premium subscription required

Unlock this article along with other benefits by subscribing to one of our paid plans.

Lat­est news: It’s a no on uni­ver­sal boost­ers; Pa­tient death stuns gene ther­a­py field; In­side Tril­li­um’s $2.3B turn­around; and more

Welcome back to Endpoints Weekly, your review of the week’s top biopharma headlines. Want this in your inbox every Saturday morning? Current Endpoints readers can visit their reader profile to add Endpoints Weekly. New to Endpoints? Sign up here.

Next week is shaping up to be a busy one, as our editor-in-chief John Carroll and managing editor Kyle Blankenship lead back-to-back discussions with a great group of experts to discuss the weekend news and trends. John will be spending 30 minutes with Jake Van Naarden, the CEO of Lilly Oncology, and Kyle has a brilliant panel lined up: Harvard’s Cigall Kadoch, Susan Galbraith, the new head of cancer R&D at AstraZeneca, Roy Baynes at Merck, and James Christensen at Mirati. Don’t miss out on the action — sign up here.

Endpoints News

Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription

Unlock this story instantly and join 117,600+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free.

Mi­rati's KRAS drug looks like the fa­vorite in colon can­cer with new da­ta, putting the pres­sure square on Am­gen

With Amgen already providing proof-of-concept for KRAS inhibitors with its sotorasib, Mirati Therapeutics is piecing together a follow-up effort in lung cancer with data it thinks are superior. But in colon cancer, where solo sotorasib has turned in a dud, Mirati may now have a strong case for superiority.

Mirati’s adagrasib, dosed solo or in combination with chemotherapy cetuximab, showed response rates grater than sotorasib solo  and as part of combination study in a similar patient population also revealed this week at #ESMO21. Mirati’s data were presented as part of a cohort update from the Phase II KRYSTAL-1 study testing adagrasib in a range of solid tumors harboring the KRAS-G12C mutation.

Endpoints News

Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription

Unlock this story instantly and join 117,600+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free.

President Biden and Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla (Patrick Semansky/AP Images)

Chaot­ic ad­comm sees Pfiz­er/BioN­Tech boost­ers re­ject­ed for gen­er­al pop­u­la­tion, but rec­om­mend­ed for old­er and high-risk pop­u­la­tions

With just days before President Joe Biden’s Covid-19 booster rollout is set to go into effect, an FDA advisory committee appeared on the verge of not recommending boosters for anyone in the US before a last-minute change of wording laid the groundwork for older adults to have access to a third dose.

The FDA’s adcomm on Vaccines and Related Biological Products (VRBPAC) roundly rejected Pfizer/BioNTech booster shots for all individuals older than 16 by a 16-2 vote Friday afternoon. Soon after, however, the agency posed committee members a new question limiting booster use to the 65-and-older population and individuals at high risk of disease due to occupational exposure or comorbidities.

The best of the rest: High­lights from the be­low-the-fold pre­sen­ta­tions at #ES­MO21

This year’s ESMO Congress has had a major focus on Big Pharma drugs — most notably candidates from Merck and AstraZeneca — but there have also been updates from smaller biotechs with data looking to challenge the big-name drugmakers.

Today, we’re highlighting some of the data releases that flew under the radar at #ESMO21 — whether from early-stage drugs looking to make a mark or older stalwarts with interesting follow-up data.

As­traZeneca, Dai­ichi Sanky­o's ADC En­her­tu blows away Roche's Kad­cy­la in sec­ond-line ad­vanced breast can­cer

AstraZeneca and Japanese drugmaker Daiichi Sankyo think they’ve struck gold with their next-gen ADC drug Enhertu, which has shown some striking data in late-stage breast cancer trials and early solid tumor tests. Getting into earlier patients is now the goal, starting with Enhertu’s complete walkover of a Roche drug in second-line breast cancer revealed Saturday.

Enhertu cut the risk of disease progression or death by a whopping 72% (p=<0.0001) compared with Roche’s ADC Kadcyla in second-line unresectable and/or metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer patients who had previously undergone treatment with a Herceptin-chemo combo, according to interim data from the Phase III DESTINY-Breast03 head-to-head study presented at this weekend’s #ESMO21.

Endpoints News

Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription

Unlock this story instantly and join 117,600+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free.

Merck Research Laboratories CMO Roy Baynes

Mer­ck­'s Keytru­da un­corks full da­ta on lat­est ad­ju­vant win — this time in melanoma — adding bricks to ear­ly can­cer wall

In recent months, the battle for PD-(L)1 dominance has spilled over into early cancer with Merck’s Keytruda and Bristol Myers Squibb’s Opdivo all alone on the front lines. Keytruda now has another shell in its bandolier, and it could spell a quick approval.

Keytruda cut the risk of relapse or death by 35% over placebo (p=0.00658) in high-risk, stage 2 melanoma patients who had previously undergone surgery to remove their tumors, according to full data from the Phase III KEYNOTE-716 presented Saturday at #ESMO21.

Mer­ck flesh­es out Keytru­da win in first-line cer­vi­cal can­cer, adding more fire­pow­er to its ear­ly can­cer push

Merck has worked hard to bring its I/O blockbuster Keytruda into earlier and earlier lines of therapy, and now the wonder drug appears poised to make a quick entry into early advanced cervical cancer.

A combination of Keytruda and chemotherapy with or without Roche’s Avastin cut the risk of death by 33% over chemo with or without Avastin (p=<0.001) in first-line patients with persistent, recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer, according to full data from the Phase III KEYNOTE-826 study presented Saturday at #ESMO21.