These 300(+) Biotech Twit­ter cit­i­zens are the quick­est to tweet news


Like many of you, I have a com­pli­cat­ed re­la­tion­ship with Twit­ter. I don’t feel good at it, but here I am ob­sess­ing over it. I re­sent feel­ing like I need to be good at it. That’s a bad way to feel about a re­la­tion­ship you’ve been in for sev­en years.

Your friends have more friends than you do — this is the rub of so­cial net­work­ing. There isn’t a pro­fes­sion­al I know who is proud of the small size of their Rolodex. It’s no won­der so many in bio­phar­ma join Twit­ter on­ly to aban­don it af­ter a few tweets. The de­fault state of their new ac­count ad­ver­tis­es to the world that no­body at all fol­lows what you have to say. That doesn’t feel good ei­ther.

If you work in­side bio­phar­ma, I’ll ad­mit there’s not much rea­son for you to post to Twit­ter. Yes, there are ex­cep­tions and many en­joy a rich­er ca­reer as a re­sult. But it’s not true for a big ma­jor­i­ty. Most knowl­edge in bio­phar­ma is held in the minds and ex­pe­ri­ences of peo­ple and com­pa­nies. These are not shared in pub­lic.

The beau­ty of Twit­ter is that you don’t have to say any­thing at all.

Read-on­ly Twit­ter

The dirty se­cret of Twit­ter is that it’s de­pen­dent on jour­nal­ists and pro­fes­sion­al con­tent-cre­ators. We go to Face­book to see time­lines of our friends and fam­i­ly. LinkedIn time­lines on­ly mat­ter if you’re on a job hunt or re­cruit­ing peo­ple your­self.

Se­ri­ous news hounds turn to Twit­ter be­cause it’s the on­ly se­ri­ous place to craft a hard news time­line. And it turns out “read-on­ly Twit­ter” is quite an amaz­ing prod­uct. When you tune in­to the con­ver­sa­tions of oth­ers, you learn things you didn’t know you need­ed to know.

Jour­nal­ists, brands, and bots all rush to post con­tent the mo­ment it’s fit for con­sump­tion. Some links have legs, oth­ers don’t. It’s an op­er­at­ing sys­tem for the dis­sem­i­na­tion of news and the meta-com­men­tary that fol­lows. This is the top of the pub­lic in­fo pyra­mid. From here these things fil­ter down­stream to the 80% of the in­dus­try who have no re­la­tion­ship with Twit­ter.

Plug­ging your ear in­to the top of this nerve cen­ter gets you clos­er and faster to this in­for­ma­tion. Whether this in­for­ma­tion is good or bad, that’s for you to de­cide. Like the tele­phone game, where you tell some­one some­thing and it changes down­stream, your in­for­ma­tion is pur­er the clos­er it was to the sig­nal. It’s with­out the col­or. No ana­log degra­da­tion.

Too much noise

Hav­ing asym­met­ric in­for­ma­tion is a huge ad­van­tage in busi­ness, right? You know some­thing some­body else doesn’t, and they don’t have ac­cess to those bit of in­fo. This is how it worked in 1990.

In 2016 you can pos­sess asym­met­ric in­for­ma­tion that’s freely avail­able to all, but was lost in the dig­i­tal ether of tweets, press re­leas­es, al­go­spam, and Na­tive Ӓd­ver­tis­ing. In­for­ma­tion is eas­i­ly buried in the con­tent swamp. You just can’t see it all.

Now there’s plen­ty of firms who’ll charge a $10,000 month­ly re­tain­er to sift through these tweets, trav­el ob­scure parts of the web, trav­el be­hind the pay­walls, send you a sum­ma­ry, make sure things don’t fall through the cracks. A few lucky bio­phar­ma ex­ec­u­tives en­joy these perks.

What if you’re brand new to bio­phar­ma? How about if you’re a sea­soned vet but just new to Twit­ter? How do you know who to fol­low? Twit­ter for all in­tents and pur­pos­es is a con­sumer brand. De­spite it be­ing a rich, im­me­di­ate source of in­for­ma­tion for drug de­vel­op­ers, Twit­ter the com­pa­ny has no prod­ucts to on­board such a niche au­di­ence.

We love Twit­ter at End­points and want more peo­ple in bio­phar­ma to en­joy the ben­e­fits of it — even as a pro­fes­sion­al lurk­er.

In­tro­duc­ing Mar­co, our news­bot

Last Au­gust we qui­et­ly launched our vi­ral news­bot@endpts. We re­cent­ly named it Mar­co — con­stant­ly ex­plor­ing BioTwit­ter.

It’s job is to:

  • Search for links in every tweet made in a known uni­verse of thou­sands of BioTwit­ter ac­counts;
  • Cal­cu­late the ve­loc­i­ty of each link shared;
  • If a link starts mov­ing much faster rel­a­tive to oth­er links, it’s now trend­ing;
    • Mar­co then vis­its the link it­self and ex­tracts the head­line, au­thor, and source. We want our own, in­de­pen­dent in­for­ma­tion about the link.
  • Mar­co then tweets the link. It gives cred­it with a hat tip [h/t] to the ac­count that it saw tweet the link first.

It’s that last part that forms the ba­sis of this spe­cial re­port: who was the first per­son to re­port this news?

Mar­co has been read­ing BioTwit­ter 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for al­most a a year now. Over this time we can ag­gre­gate the hat tips Mar­co doled out and come up with this ex­act list.

We guar­an­tee if you fol­low a healthy seg­ment of this list — you’re plugged in­to to heart of the link econ­o­my on BioTwit­ter.

What this list is not

Any­time you rank your friends and col­leagues there’s bound to be hard feel­ings. So let me state for the record:

  • This is not a list of the best ac­counts to fol­low in BioTwit­ter. Many tweeps nev­er post links and in­stead con­tribute with con­text and analy­sis. Mar­co is a few tech­no­log­i­cal rev­o­lu­tions away from be­ing able to un­der­stand when some­one is be­ing sar­cas­tic or help­ful, so it ig­nores text-on­ly tweets. And that’s of­ten the best part of Twit­ter.
  • This is not a who’s who list. There are plen­ty of those around and none of them do any­thing for the per­son who sim­ply wants to be the best pro­fes­sion­al lurk­er on BioTwit­ter.
  • There are no val­ue judge­ments here. This is a pure­ly da­ta-dri­ven list. Yes, it’s our own pro­pri­ety da­ta and I’m not like­ly to di­vulge the ex­act man­ner in which we re­duce the fire­hose of BioTwit­ter in­to a trick­le. But we’re pre­sent­ing the da­ta as-is.


Biotech Twit­ter cit­i­zens most fre­quent­ly cred­it­ed with post­ing trend­ing links first

Over 100 hat tips
John­Cendpts
Fierce­Biotech
Bio­S­tocks
brad­lon­car
Andy­Biotech
adamfeuer­stein
matthe­wher­p­er
phar­malot
Er­ic­Topol
Ben­the­Fi­dler
Fier­cePhar­ma

 

50 – 99 hat tips
Derek­lowe
megtir­rell
Ja­cob­Pli­eth
Mav­er­ick­NY
cru­sadernz
Scrip­Don­naDC
Bos­Biz­Don
ld­tim­mer­man
busi­ness
jonathanrock­off
Reuters_Health
3NT
CGrantWSJ
ste­faniei
LifeSciVC

 

20 – 49 hat tips
Arm­strong­Drew
BioRunUp
reuters­Ben­Hir
Biotech­World
John_LaMat­ti­na
Na­ture­News
car­dio­brief
Lof­tus
an­to­niore­gal­a­do
Jean­neWhalen
ivanoran­sky
Zachary­Bren­nan
Car­o­lineYLChen
AKAarsalan
Emi­ly­W­Fierce
DShay­witz
Black­Swan­Phar­ma
Wrigley­Tom
kris­ten_hal­lam
GideonGil
Bio­DueDili­gence
Reuters­Biz
Car­ly­H­Fierce
WSJbusi­ness
phar­magos­sip
TST­biotech
jq1234t
scrip­news
ZTrac­er
alexlash
ar­lenewein­traub
IPOtweet
WS­JA­sia
bio_clouse­au
FDALawyers
NPRHealth
ByJon­Gard­ner
charlesorn­stein
FDAad­comm
cafephar­ma
PDRen­nert
WSJ
lisam­jarvis
edy­ong209
NE­JM
ju­liaoftoron­to
rplenge
denis­eroland
lo­mu_j

 

At least 10 hat tips
techre­view
Boston­Globe
Reuters
pk­noepfler
WSJhealth
Lau­ra­LandroWSJ
porte­feuille­fun
El­y­se­Tanouye
sdbn
an­drew_ward1
TomBur­ton­WSJ
Ac­tivist­Shorts
Fay­Cortez
Biotech­News
dg­macarthur
dr­bachin­sky
Na­ture­Biotech
zbiotech
cells_nnm
Fes­tivus159
iito­Life­Science
skathire
medtech_ma
US_FDA
genen­tech
DewDili­gence
RNA­i­An­a­lyst
cray­ton_h
FT
vox­dot­com
Scrip­Mandy
car­lz­im­mer
vir­gini­ahugh­es
dhovekamp42
Alec­Gaffney
NYTHealth
PhilSer­afi­no
hmkyale
steveus­din1
fdalaw­blog
The­At­lantic
Scot­tKirsner
IAmBiotech
stem­cel­las­says
TheStal­wart
Trade­Hawk
Bio­Break­out
an­naed­ney
politi­co
ddi­a­mond
sxbe­gle
Frank_S_David
CMichael­Gib­son
Mogu­lAzam
Dr­MiguelPerales
ScripEleanor
Bio­Cen­tu­ry
brentl­saun­ders
rleu­ty_biotech
michael_mezher
ProP­ub­li­ca
rick­berke
Gan­tosJ
Dan­Bud­wick
Phar­ma­ceu­ticBen
FierceMed­Dev
sci­en­tre
srq­s­tock­pick­er
CN­BC

 

At least 4 hat tips
joe­walk­er­WSJ
ethanjweiss
23alo­ha
forbeshealth
GlobeR­obW
EMA_News
sci­ences­can­ner
Ope­nOut­crier
Mike­Huck­man
big3bio­BOS
davies­bj
Mer­ck
mt­md­phd
Drchik23
Med­ical­News
SA_Health­In­vest
db­sable
dan­pri­mack
an­naw­math­ews
guardian­science
Med­ical­New­sUSA
taralach
eval­u­atephar­ma
Ram­sey_Bagh­da­di
westr
ze­ro­hedge
Liq­uid_Biop­sy
Lin_ling_88
dsobek
Ai­ims1742
DrAD­Kline
JNapo­dano
BioWorld
LizSz­abo
BI_Sci­ence
TechCrunch
US­ATO­DAY
not­So­JunkD­NA
ideaphar­ma
Mar­tin­Shkre­li
Evavon­Schaper
mau­reen­m­far­rell
Car­olynyjohn­son
BioTerp
cb­tad­vi­sors
bm­snews
Al­ny­lam
at­ti­cusMB
fund­Duchenne
SashaDamouni
Tim­mer­man­Re­port
bbchealth
bmj_lat­est
Fier­cePhar­mA­sia
biotech­day
FDA_Drug_In­fo
Prop­Thinker
No­var­tis­S­cience
matt_levine
blsuth
FDA­Me­dia
News­from­Science
Sud­han­vaRaj
FiveThir­tyEight
vlad33301
dami­an­garde
BlinkX90
sandiego­science
Mykalt45
Adam­Singer
ScottGot­tlieb­MD
Don­WNi­chol­son
Grady­For­rer
AS­CO
Davi­dAStein­berg
RPM­Re­port­Mike
sloan_ket­ter­ing
Hum­bleBio­Trad­er
JA­MA_cur­rent
Chillz­Trad­ing
SueD­Hell­mann
jay­brad­ner
daph­ne­zo­har
Vikas­Dan­dekarET
cd­weaver
bh­munos
SIRF_Re­port
mslopat­to
michaelscal­ly
michael_gilman
Dougal­lan1
prince­tongb
Drug­Patent­Watch
chris­sy­farr
Za­ck­foot
ma­ki_ki­ta­mu­ra
jfli­er
Life­SciencesMkt
wilbanks
He­len­Bran­swell
afrakt
rt­narch
Ogut_Ozgur
aman­dam­ick­lus
walidgel­lad
smhedge­cock
iBo­nanos
PearlF
jtozz
maryn­m­ck
Dr­Jen­Gunter
Boston_Biotech
broad­in­sti­tute
ES­chat­tner
pi­car­don­health
ScripLu­cie
can­cer­doc­NYC
Xcon­o­my
No­var­tis
hrana
BioWriter­Chik
Nick­PaulTay­lor
WHO
phar­ma­con­nect
myger­sh­berg
gau­tamkol­lu
An­a­lyst­Wire
Econ­SciTech
EP­Clin­i­cal­Tri­al
Bio­Med­Track­er
pe­ter­bach­md
Caulfield­Tim
Mar­i­lyn­Mann
John_Hemp­ton
mbeisen
John­PLeonard­MD
charles_ga­ba
aleszuba­jak
Black­Hawk­Trad­er
JCM­c­Crack­en
Break­ingNews
jodi­gral­nick
eye­onf­da
Robert­Langreth
berna­tolle
cel­lec­tis
Kathy­Giusti
RS_Flinn
Arthur­Ca­plan
bertha­coombs
Lym­phoma_Doc
aaronecar­roll
NIH
NYTScience
Street_In­sid­er
David­Ju­urlink
Na­tRevDrugDisc
ac­taest­fab­u­laXX
23Chromz
EP­Van­tage
Fast­Com­pa­ny
Mau­riceOn­TW
An­nemarieVtW
biotech­baumer
ewan­bir­ney
Jack­West­MD
On­col­o­gy­Times
at­lasven­ture
JPZaragoza1
BioWino
RNA_Biotech
John­Tuck­er­PhD
Col­fax­Cap­i­tal
si­mon­bay­ly
NBC­New­sHealth
fw­phar­ma
In­natePhar­ma
Er­icP­Fierce
thinkgenome
AC­In­vestor­Blog
AlpineBV_Miller
HaertlG
Scrip­Mike­Ward
Roche
at­ul­butte
Na­tureMed­i­cine
Brent Saunders [Getty Photos]

UP­DAT­ED: Ab­b­Vie seals $63B deal to buy a trou­bled Al­ler­gan — spelling out $1B in R&D cuts

Brent Saunders has found his way out of the current fix he’s in at Allergan $AGN. He’s selling the company to AbbVie for $63 billion in the latest example of the hot M&A market in biopharma.

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Zo­genix plans quick re­turn to the FDA with their re­cent­ly spurned ap­pli­ca­tion on Dravet syn­drome drug — shares spike

Zo­genix shares are claw­ing back some of the val­ue they lost 2 months ago af­ter the FDA hit the biotech with a refuse-to-file no­tice on their ex­per­i­men­tal ther­a­py for Dravet syn­drome. 

Com­pa­ny ex­ecs said this morn­ing that they worked out reg­u­la­tors’  is­sues with the ap­pli­ca­tion for Fin­tepla, which cen­tered on a pair of big prob­lems: the ab­sence of non-clin­i­cal stud­ies need­ed to al­low as­sess­ment of the chron­ic ad­min­is­tra­tion of fen­flu­ramine and the in­clu­sion of an in­cor­rect ver­sion of a clin­i­cal dataset. Now they plan to re­sub­mit in Q3 af­ter get­ting off the hook on both scores — which trig­gered a sigh of re­lief among in­vestors.

Turned back at the FDA, Im­muno­Gen is ax­ing 220 staffers, sell­ing pro­grams and hun­ker­ing down for a new PhI­II gam­ble

After being stymied by FDA regulators who were unconvinced by ImmunoGen’s $IMGN desperation shot at an accelerated OK based on a secondary endpoint, the struggling biotech is slashing its workforce, shuttering R&D projects and looking for buyers to pick up some of its experimental cancer assets as it goes back into a new Phase III with the lead drug.

We found out last month that the FDA had batted back their case for an accelerated approval of their antibody-drug conjugate mirvetuximab soravtansine, which had earlier failed a Phase III study for ovarian cancer. Now the other shoe is dropping.

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Bridge­Bio takes crown for biggest biotech IPO of 2019, as fel­low uni­corn Adap­tive rais­es of­fer­ing size and price

Bridge­Bio Phar­ma and Adap­tive Biotech­nolo­gies have not just up­sized IPO of­fer­ings — the pair of uni­corns have al­so raised their of­fer­ing prices above the range, haul­ing in a com­bined $648.5 mil­lion.

Neil Ku­mar’s Bridge­Bio Phar­ma, found­ed in 2015, has a sta­ble of com­pa­nies fo­cused on dis­eases that are dri­ven by de­fects in a sin­gle gene — en­com­pass­ing der­ma­tol­ogy, car­di­ol­o­gy, neu­rol­o­gy, en­docrinol­o­gy, re­nal dis­ease, and oph­thal­mol­o­gy — and can­cers with clear ge­net­ic dri­vers. The start­up mill birthed a pletho­ra of firms such as Ei­dos, Navire, QED Ther­a­peu­tics and Pelle­Pharm, which func­tion as its sub­sidiaries.

As­traZeneca chal­lenges Roche on front­line SCLC af­ter seiz­ing an in­ter­im win — and Mer­ck may not be far be­hind

The crowded playing field in the PD-1/L1 marketing game is about to get a little more complex.

This morning AstraZeneca reported that its CASPIAN study delivered a hit in an interim readout for their PD-L1 Imfinzi combined with etoposide and platinum-based chemotherapy options for frontline cases of small cell lung cancer, a tough target which has already knocked back Bristol-Myers’ shot in second-line cases. The positive data  — which we won’t see before they roll it out at an upcoming scientific conference — give AstraZeneca excellent odds of a quick vault to challenging Roche’s Tecentriq-chemo combo, approved 3 months ago for frontline SCLC in a landmark advance.

“This is the first trial offering the flexibility of combining immunotherapy with different platinum-based regimens in small cell lung cancer, expanding treatment options,” noted AstraZeneca cancer R&D chief José Baselga in a statement.

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Novotech CEO Dr. John Moller

Novotech CRO Award­ed Frost & Sul­li­van Best Biotech CRO Asia-Pa­cif­ic 2019

Known in the in­dus­try as the Asia-Pa­cif­ic CRO, Novotech is now lead CRO ser­vices provider for the grow­ing num­ber of in­ter­na­tion­al biotechs se­lect­ing the re­gion for their stud­ies.

Re­flect­ing this Asia-Pa­cif­ic growth, Novotech staff num­bers are up 20% since De­cem­ber 2018 to 600 in-house clin­i­cal re­search peo­ple across a full range of ser­vices, across the re­gion.

Novotech’s ca­pa­bil­i­ties have been rec­og­nized by an­a­lysts like Frost & Sul­li­van, most re­cent­ly with the pres­ti­gious Asia-Pa­cif­ic CRO Biotech of the year award for best prac­tices in clin­i­cal re­search for biotechs for the fifth year. See oth­er awards here.

Af­ter rais­ing $158M, this up­start's founders have star back­ers and plans to break new ground in gene ther­a­py

Back in 2014, Stephanie Tagliatela opted to take an early exit out of her PhD program after working in Mark Bear’s lab at MIT, where she specialized in the synaptic connections between neuronal cells in the brain. She never finished that PhD, but she and fellow MIT student Kartik Ramamoorthi — who was on the founding team at Voyager — came away with some ideas for a gene therapy startup.

Today, fully 5 years later, she and Ramamoorthi are taking the wraps off of a $104 million mega-round designed to take the cumulative work of their preclinical formative stage for Encoded Therapeutics into human studies. They’ve now raised $158 million since starting out in Illumina’s incubator in the Bay Area, and they believe they are firmly on track to do something unique in gene therapy.

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Richard Gonzalez testifying in front of Senate Finance Committee, February 2019 [AP Images]

Ab­b­Vie's $63B buy­out spot­lights the re­turn of ma­jor M&A deals — de­spite the back­lash

Big time M&A is back. But for how long?

Over the past 18 months we’ve now seen three major buyouts announced: Takeda/Shire; Bristol-Myers/Celgene and now AbbVie/Allergan. And with this latest deal it’s increasingly clear that the sharp fall from grace suffered by high-profile players which have seen their share prices blasted has created an opening for the growth players in big pharma to up their game — in sharp contrast to the popular bolt-on deals that have been driving the growth strategy at Novartis, Merck, Roche and others.

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Sanofi/Re­gen­eron mus­cle ahead of a ri­val No­var­tis/Roche team, win first ap­proval in key rhi­nos­i­nusi­tis field

Re­gen­eron and their part­ners at Sanofi have beat the No­var­tis/Roche team to the punch on an­oth­er key in­di­ca­tion for their block­buster an­ti-in­flam­ma­to­ry drug Dupix­ent. The drug team scored an ac­cel­er­at­ed FDA ap­proval for chron­ic rhi­nos­i­nusi­tis with nasal polyps, mak­ing this the first such NDA for the field.

An­a­lysts have been watch­ing this race for awhile now, as Sanofi/Re­gen­eron won a snap pri­or­i­ty re­view for what is now their third dis­ease in­di­ca­tion for this treat­ment. And they’re not near­ly done, build­ing up hopes for a ma­jor fran­chise.