These 300(+) Biotech Twit­ter cit­i­zens are the quick­est to tweet news


Like many of you, I have a com­pli­cat­ed re­la­tion­ship with Twit­ter. I don’t feel good at it, but here I am ob­sess­ing over it. I re­sent feel­ing like I need to be good at it. That’s a bad way to feel about a re­la­tion­ship you’ve been in for sev­en years.

Your friends have more friends than you do — this is the rub of so­cial net­work­ing. There isn’t a pro­fes­sion­al I know who is proud of the small size of their Rolodex. It’s no won­der so many in bio­phar­ma join Twit­ter on­ly to aban­don it af­ter a few tweets. The de­fault state of their new ac­count ad­ver­tis­es to the world that no­body at all fol­lows what you have to say. That doesn’t feel good ei­ther.

If you work in­side bio­phar­ma, I’ll ad­mit there’s not much rea­son for you to post to Twit­ter. Yes, there are ex­cep­tions and many en­joy a rich­er ca­reer as a re­sult. But it’s not true for a big ma­jor­i­ty. Most knowl­edge in bio­phar­ma is held in the minds and ex­pe­ri­ences of peo­ple and com­pa­nies. These are not shared in pub­lic.

The beau­ty of Twit­ter is that you don’t have to say any­thing at all.

Read-on­ly Twit­ter

The dirty se­cret of Twit­ter is that it’s de­pen­dent on jour­nal­ists and pro­fes­sion­al con­tent-cre­ators. We go to Face­book to see time­lines of our friends and fam­i­ly. LinkedIn time­lines on­ly mat­ter if you’re on a job hunt or re­cruit­ing peo­ple your­self.

Se­ri­ous news hounds turn to Twit­ter be­cause it’s the on­ly se­ri­ous place to craft a hard news time­line. And it turns out “read-on­ly Twit­ter” is quite an amaz­ing prod­uct. When you tune in­to the con­ver­sa­tions of oth­ers, you learn things you didn’t know you need­ed to know.

Jour­nal­ists, brands, and bots all rush to post con­tent the mo­ment it’s fit for con­sump­tion. Some links have legs, oth­ers don’t. It’s an op­er­at­ing sys­tem for the dis­sem­i­na­tion of news and the meta-com­men­tary that fol­lows. This is the top of the pub­lic in­fo pyra­mid. From here these things fil­ter down­stream to the 80% of the in­dus­try who have no re­la­tion­ship with Twit­ter.

Plug­ging your ear in­to the top of this nerve cen­ter gets you clos­er and faster to this in­for­ma­tion. Whether this in­for­ma­tion is good or bad, that’s for you to de­cide. Like the tele­phone game, where you tell some­one some­thing and it changes down­stream, your in­for­ma­tion is pur­er the clos­er it was to the sig­nal. It’s with­out the col­or. No ana­log degra­da­tion.

Too much noise

Hav­ing asym­met­ric in­for­ma­tion is a huge ad­van­tage in busi­ness, right? You know some­thing some­body else doesn’t, and they don’t have ac­cess to those bit of in­fo. This is how it worked in 1990.

In 2016 you can pos­sess asym­met­ric in­for­ma­tion that’s freely avail­able to all, but was lost in the dig­i­tal ether of tweets, press re­leas­es, al­go­spam, and Na­tive Ӓd­ver­tis­ing. In­for­ma­tion is eas­i­ly buried in the con­tent swamp. You just can’t see it all.

Now there’s plen­ty of firms who’ll charge a $10,000 month­ly re­tain­er to sift through these tweets, trav­el ob­scure parts of the web, trav­el be­hind the pay­walls, send you a sum­ma­ry, make sure things don’t fall through the cracks. A few lucky bio­phar­ma ex­ec­u­tives en­joy these perks.

What if you’re brand new to bio­phar­ma? How about if you’re a sea­soned vet but just new to Twit­ter? How do you know who to fol­low? Twit­ter for all in­tents and pur­pos­es is a con­sumer brand. De­spite it be­ing a rich, im­me­di­ate source of in­for­ma­tion for drug de­vel­op­ers, Twit­ter the com­pa­ny has no prod­ucts to on­board such a niche au­di­ence.

We love Twit­ter at End­points and want more peo­ple in bio­phar­ma to en­joy the ben­e­fits of it — even as a pro­fes­sion­al lurk­er.

In­tro­duc­ing Mar­co, our news­bot

Last Au­gust we qui­et­ly launched our vi­ral news­bot@endpts. We re­cent­ly named it Mar­co — con­stant­ly ex­plor­ing BioTwit­ter.

It’s job is to:

  • Search for links in every tweet made in a known uni­verse of thou­sands of BioTwit­ter ac­counts;
  • Cal­cu­late the ve­loc­i­ty of each link shared;
  • If a link starts mov­ing much faster rel­a­tive to oth­er links, it’s now trend­ing;
    • Mar­co then vis­its the link it­self and ex­tracts the head­line, au­thor, and source. We want our own, in­de­pen­dent in­for­ma­tion about the link.
  • Mar­co then tweets the link. It gives cred­it with a hat tip [h/t] to the ac­count that it saw tweet the link first.

It’s that last part that forms the ba­sis of this spe­cial re­port: who was the first per­son to re­port this news?

Mar­co has been read­ing BioTwit­ter 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for al­most a a year now. Over this time we can ag­gre­gate the hat tips Mar­co doled out and come up with this ex­act list.

We guar­an­tee if you fol­low a healthy seg­ment of this list — you’re plugged in­to to heart of the link econ­o­my on BioTwit­ter.

What this list is not

Any­time you rank your friends and col­leagues there’s bound to be hard feel­ings. So let me state for the record:

  • This is not a list of the best ac­counts to fol­low in BioTwit­ter. Many tweeps nev­er post links and in­stead con­tribute with con­text and analy­sis. Mar­co is a few tech­no­log­i­cal rev­o­lu­tions away from be­ing able to un­der­stand when some­one is be­ing sar­cas­tic or help­ful, so it ig­nores text-on­ly tweets. And that’s of­ten the best part of Twit­ter.
  • This is not a who’s who list. There are plen­ty of those around and none of them do any­thing for the per­son who sim­ply wants to be the best pro­fes­sion­al lurk­er on BioTwit­ter.
  • There are no val­ue judge­ments here. This is a pure­ly da­ta-dri­ven list. Yes, it’s our own pro­pri­ety da­ta and I’m not like­ly to di­vulge the ex­act man­ner in which we re­duce the fire­hose of BioTwit­ter in­to a trick­le. But we’re pre­sent­ing the da­ta as-is.


Biotech Twit­ter cit­i­zens most fre­quent­ly cred­it­ed with post­ing trend­ing links first

Over 100 hat tips
John­Cendpts
Fierce­Biotech
Bio­S­tocks
brad­lon­car
Andy­Biotech
adamfeuer­stein
matthe­wher­p­er
phar­malot
Er­ic­Topol
Ben­the­Fi­dler
Fier­cePhar­ma

 

50 – 99 hat tips
Derek­lowe
megtir­rell
Ja­cob­Pli­eth
Mav­er­ick­NY
cru­sadernz
Scrip­Don­naDC
Bos­Biz­Don
ld­tim­mer­man
busi­ness
jonathanrock­off
Reuters_Health
3NT
CGrantWSJ
ste­faniei
LifeSciVC

 

20 – 49 hat tips
Arm­strong­Drew
BioRunUp
reuters­Ben­Hir
Biotech­World
John_LaMat­ti­na
Na­ture­News
car­dio­brief
Lof­tus
an­to­niore­gal­a­do
Jean­neWhalen
ivanoran­sky
Zachary­Bren­nan
Car­o­lineYLChen
AKAarsalan
Emi­ly­W­Fierce
DShay­witz
Black­Swan­Phar­ma
Wrigley­Tom
kris­ten_hal­lam
GideonGil
Bio­DueDili­gence
Reuters­Biz
Car­ly­H­Fierce
WSJbusi­ness
phar­magos­sip
TST­biotech
jq1234t
scrip­news
ZTrac­er
alexlash
ar­lenewein­traub
IPOtweet
WS­JA­sia
bio_clouse­au
FDALawyers
NPRHealth
ByJon­Gard­ner
charlesorn­stein
FDAad­comm
cafephar­ma
PDRen­nert
WSJ
lisam­jarvis
edy­ong209
NE­JM
ju­liaoftoron­to
rplenge
denis­eroland
lo­mu_j

 

At least 10 hat tips
techre­view
Boston­Globe
Reuters
pk­noepfler
WSJhealth
Lau­ra­LandroWSJ
porte­feuille­fun
El­y­se­Tanouye
sdbn
an­drew_ward1
TomBur­ton­WSJ
Ac­tivist­Shorts
Fay­Cortez
Biotech­News
dg­macarthur
dr­bachin­sky
Na­ture­Biotech
zbiotech
cells_nnm
Fes­tivus159
iito­Life­Science
skathire
medtech_ma
US_FDA
genen­tech
DewDili­gence
RNA­i­An­a­lyst
cray­ton_h
FT
vox­dot­com
Scrip­Mandy
car­lz­im­mer
vir­gini­ahugh­es
dhovekamp42
Alec­Gaffney
NYTHealth
PhilSer­afi­no
hmkyale
steveus­din1
fdalaw­blog
The­At­lantic
Scot­tKirsner
IAmBiotech
stem­cel­las­says
TheStal­wart
Trade­Hawk
Bio­Break­out
an­naed­ney
politi­co
ddi­a­mond
sxbe­gle
Frank_S_David
CMichael­Gib­son
Mogu­lAzam
Dr­MiguelPerales
ScripEleanor
Bio­Cen­tu­ry
brentl­saun­ders
rleu­ty_biotech
michael_mezher
ProP­ub­li­ca
rick­berke
Gan­tosJ
Dan­Bud­wick
Phar­ma­ceu­ticBen
FierceMed­Dev
sci­en­tre
srq­s­tock­pick­er
CN­BC

 

At least 4 hat tips
joe­walk­er­WSJ
ethanjweiss
23alo­ha
forbeshealth
GlobeR­obW
EMA_News
sci­ences­can­ner
Ope­nOut­crier
Mike­Huck­man
big3bio­BOS
davies­bj
Mer­ck
mt­md­phd
Drchik23
Med­ical­News
SA_Health­In­vest
db­sable
dan­pri­mack
an­naw­math­ews
guardian­science
Med­ical­New­sUSA
taralach
eval­u­atephar­ma
Ram­sey_Bagh­da­di
westr
ze­ro­hedge
Liq­uid_Biop­sy
Lin_ling_88
dsobek
Ai­ims1742
DrAD­Kline
JNapo­dano
BioWorld
LizSz­abo
BI_Sci­ence
TechCrunch
US­ATO­DAY
not­So­JunkD­NA
ideaphar­ma
Mar­tin­Shkre­li
Evavon­Schaper
mau­reen­m­far­rell
Car­olynyjohn­son
BioTerp
cb­tad­vi­sors
bm­snews
Al­ny­lam
at­ti­cusMB
fund­Duchenne
SashaDamouni
Tim­mer­man­Re­port
bbchealth
bmj_lat­est
Fier­cePhar­mA­sia
biotech­day
FDA_Drug_In­fo
Prop­Thinker
No­var­tis­S­cience
matt_levine
blsuth
FDA­Me­dia
News­from­Science
Sud­han­vaRaj
FiveThir­tyEight
vlad33301
dami­an­garde
BlinkX90
sandiego­science
Mykalt45
Adam­Singer
ScottGot­tlieb­MD
Don­WNi­chol­son
Grady­For­rer
AS­CO
Davi­dAStein­berg
RPM­Re­port­Mike
sloan_ket­ter­ing
Hum­bleBio­Trad­er
JA­MA_cur­rent
Chillz­Trad­ing
SueD­Hell­mann
jay­brad­ner
daph­ne­zo­har
Vikas­Dan­dekarET
cd­weaver
bh­munos
SIRF_Re­port
mslopat­to
michaelscal­ly
michael_gilman
Dougal­lan1
prince­tongb
Drug­Patent­Watch
chris­sy­farr
Za­ck­foot
ma­ki_ki­ta­mu­ra
jfli­er
Life­SciencesMkt
wilbanks
He­len­Bran­swell
afrakt
rt­narch
Ogut_Ozgur
aman­dam­ick­lus
walidgel­lad
smhedge­cock
iBo­nanos
PearlF
jtozz
maryn­m­ck
Dr­Jen­Gunter
Boston_Biotech
broad­in­sti­tute
ES­chat­tner
pi­car­don­health
ScripLu­cie
can­cer­doc­NYC
Xcon­o­my
No­var­tis
hrana
BioWriter­Chik
Nick­PaulTay­lor
WHO
phar­ma­con­nect
myger­sh­berg
gau­tamkol­lu
An­a­lyst­Wire
Econ­SciTech
EP­Clin­i­cal­Tri­al
Bio­Med­Track­er
pe­ter­bach­md
Caulfield­Tim
Mar­i­lyn­Mann
John_Hemp­ton
mbeisen
John­PLeonard­MD
charles_ga­ba
aleszuba­jak
Black­Hawk­Trad­er
JCM­c­Crack­en
Break­ingNews
jodi­gral­nick
eye­onf­da
Robert­Langreth
berna­tolle
cel­lec­tis
Kathy­Giusti
RS_Flinn
Arthur­Ca­plan
bertha­coombs
Lym­phoma_Doc
aaronecar­roll
NIH
NYTScience
Street_In­sid­er
David­Ju­urlink
Na­tRevDrugDisc
ac­taest­fab­u­laXX
23Chromz
EP­Van­tage
Fast­Com­pa­ny
Mau­riceOn­TW
An­nemarieVtW
biotech­baumer
ewan­bir­ney
Jack­West­MD
On­col­o­gy­Times
at­lasven­ture
JPZaragoza1
BioWino
RNA_Biotech
John­Tuck­er­PhD
Col­fax­Cap­i­tal
si­mon­bay­ly
NBC­New­sHealth
fw­phar­ma
In­natePhar­ma
Er­icP­Fierce
thinkgenome
AC­In­vestor­Blog
AlpineBV_Miller
HaertlG
Scrip­Mike­Ward
Roche
at­ul­butte
Na­tureMed­i­cine

UP­DAT­ED: Clay Sie­gall’s $614M wa­ger on tu­ca­tinib pays off with solid­ly pos­i­tive piv­otal da­ta and a date with the FDA

Back at the beginning of 2018, Clay Siegall snagged a cancer drug called tucatinib with a $614 million cash deal to buy Cascadian. It paid off today with a solid set of mid-stage data for HER2 positive breast cancer that will in turn serve as the pivotal win Siegall needs to seek an accelerated approval in the push for a new triplet therapy.

And if all the cards keep falling in its favor, they’ll move from 1 drug on the market to 3 in 2020, which is shaping up as a landmark year as Seattle Genetics prepares for its 23rd anniversary on July 15.

Endpoints News

Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription

Unlock this story instantly and join 62,500+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free.

Med­ical an­i­ma­tion: Mak­ing it eas­i­er for the site and the pa­tient to un­der­stand

Medical animation has in recent years become an increasingly important tool for conveying niche information to a varied audience, particularly to those audiences without expertise in the specialist area. Science programmes today, for example, have moved from the piece-to-camera of the university professor explaining how a complex disease mechanism works, to actually showing the viewer first-hand what it might look like to shrink ourselves down to the size of an ant’s foot, and travel inside the human body to witness these processes in action. Effectively communicating a complex disease pathophysiology, or the novel mechanism of action of a new drug, can be complex. This is especially difficult when the audience domain knowledge is limited or non-existent. Medical animation can help with this communication challenge in several ways.
Improved accessibility to visualisation
Visualisation is a core component of our ability to understand a concept. Ask 10 people to visualise an apple, and each will come up with a slightly different image, some apples smaller than others, some more round, some with bites taken. Acceptable, you say, we can move on to the next part of the story. Now ask 10 people to visualise how HIV’s capsid protein gets arranged into the hexamers and pentamers that form the viral capsid that holds HIV’s genetic material. This request may pose a challenge even to someone with some virology knowledge, and it is that inability to effectively visualise what is going on that holds us back from fully understanding the rest of the story. So how does medical animation help us to overcome this visualisation challenge?

As­traZeneca's Farx­i­ga scores FDA nod to cut risk of hos­pi­tal­iza­tion for heart fail­ure in di­a­bet­ics

While the FDA recently spurned an application to allow AstraZeneca’s blockbuster drug Farxiga for type 1 diabetes that cannot be controlled by insulin, citing safety concerns — the US regulator has endorsed the use of the SGLT2 treatment to reduce the risk of hospitalisation for heart failure in patients with type-2 diabetes and established cardiovascular disease or multiple CV risk factors.

IM­brave150: Roche’s reg­u­la­to­ry crew plans a glob­al roll­out of Tecen­triq com­bo for liv­er can­cer as PhI­II scores a hit

Just weeks after Bristol-Myers Squibb defended its failed pivotal study pitting Opdivo against Nexavar in liver cancer, Roche says it’s beat the frontline challenge with a combination of their PD-L1 Tecentriq with Avastin. And now they’re rolling their regulatory teams in the US, Europe and China in search of a new approval — badly needed to boost a trailing franchise effort.
Given their breakthrough and Big Pharma status as well as the use of two approved drugs, FDA approval may well prove to be something of a formality. And the Chinese have been clear that they want new drugs for liver cancer, where lethal disease rates are particularly high.
Researchers at their big biotech sub, Genentech, say that the combo beat Bayer’s Nexavar on both progression-free survival as well as overall survival — the first advance in this field in more than a decade. We won’t get the breakdown in months of life gained, but it’s a big win for Roche, which has lagged far, far behind Keytruda and Opdivo, the dominant PD-1s that have captured the bulk of the checkpoint market so far.
Researchers recruited hepatocellular carcinoma — the most common form of liver cancer — patients for the IMbrave150 study who weren’t eligible for surgery ahead of any systemic treatment of the disease.
Roche has a fairly low bar to beat, with modest survival benefit for Nexavar, approved for this indication 12 years ago. But they also plan to offer a combo therapy that could have significantly less toxicity, offering patients a much easier treatment regimen.
Cowen’s Steven Scala recently sized up the importance of IMbrave150, noting:

Endpoints News

Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription

Unlock this story instantly and join 62,500+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free.

Alex­ion clinch­es aHUS ap­proval for Ul­tomiris as the clock ticks on Soliris con­ver­sion

Alexion has racked up a second approval for Ultomiris, the successor therapy to Soliris, as its mainstay blockbuster therapy faces a patent review process that could drastically shorten its patent exclusivity.

The FDA OK for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) on Friday was widely expected after Alexion posted a full slate of positive Phase III data in January. But regulators also flagged concerns about serious meningococcal infections, slapping a black box warning on the label and mandating a REMS.

FDA ap­proval lets Foamix set its maid­en ac­ne ther­a­py on course for US mar­ket launch

Months ago, Foamix leaned on its biggest shareholders — Perceptive Advisors and OrbiMed — to financially grease its wheels, ahead of the FDA decision date for its acne therapy. On Friday, that approval came in — and the topical formulation of the antibiotic minocycline is set for a January launch.

The therapy, Amzeeq (formerly known as FMX101), was approved to treat inflammatory lesions of non-nodular moderate-to-severe acne vulgaris in patients aged 9 and older.

Hal Barron, GSK's president of R&D and CSO, speaks to Endpoints News founder and editor John Carroll in London at Endpoints' #UKBIO19 summit on October 8, 2019

[Video] Cel­e­brat­ing tri­al fail­ures, chang­ing the cul­ture and al­ly­ing with Cal­i­for­nia dream­ers: R&D chief Hal Bar­ron talks about a new era at GSK

Last week I had a chance to sit down with Hal Barron at Endpoints’ #UKBIO19 summit to discuss his views on R&D at GSK, a topic that has been central to his life since he took the top research post close to 2 years ago. During the conversation, Barron talked about changing the culture at GSK, a move that involves several new approaches — one of which involves celebrating their setbacks as they shift resources to the most promising programs in the pipeline. Barron also discussed his new alliances in the Bay Area — including his collaboration pact with Lyell, which we covered here — frankly assesses the pluses and minuses of the UK drug development scene, and talks about his plans for making GSK a much more effective drug developer.

This is one discussion you won’t want to miss. Insider and Enterprise subscribers can log-in to watch the video.

Endpoints Premium

Premium subscription required

Unlock this article along with other benefits by subscribing to one of our paid plans.

Christine Bunt, Robert Langer. Verseau

Armed with Langer tech and $50M, Verseau hails new check­point drugs un­leash­ing macrophages against can­cer

The rising popularity of CD47 has propelled the “don’t-eat-me” signal to household name status in the immuno-oncology world: By blocking that protein, the theory goes, one can stop cancer cells from fooling macrophages. But just as PD-(L)1 merely represents the most fruitful of all checkpoints regulating T cells, Verseau Therapeutics is convinced that CD47 is one of many regulators one can modulate to stir up or tame the immune system.

Alice Shaw, Lung Cancer Foundation of America

Top ALK ex­pert and can­cer drug re­searcher Al­ice Shaw bids adieu to acad­e­mia, hel­lo to No­var­tis

Jay Bradner has recruited a marquee oncology drug researcher into the ranks of the Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research. Alice Shaw is jumping from prestigious posts intertwined through Mass General, Harvard and Dana-Farber to take the lead of NIBR’s translational clinical oncology group.

Endpoints News

Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription

Unlock this story instantly and join 62,500+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free.