Covid-19 roundup: An old, cheap steroid proves to be a ma­jor boon to coro­n­avirus pa­tients; BAR­DA puts $85M be­hind Re­gen­eron an­ti­body ef­fort

Re­searchers to­day spot­light­ed da­ta from a clin­i­cal study of­fer­ing the first hard ev­i­dence that a treat­ment can save the lives of pa­tients suf­fer­ing from Covid-19.

The old gener­ic dex­am­etha­sone was tied to a one-third re­duc­tion of deaths among ven­ti­lat­ed pa­tients with a one-fifth re­duc­tion in mor­tal­i­ty among a group get­ting oxy­gen. There was no ben­e­fit for pa­tients who did not re­quire res­pi­ra­to­ry as­sis­tance.

“Dex­am­etha­sone is the first drug to be shown to im­prove sur­vival in COVID-19,” not­ed Pe­ter Hor­by, an Ox­ford pro­fes­sor and a chief in­ves­ti­ga­tor in the tri­al. “This is an ex­treme­ly wel­come re­sult. The sur­vival ben­e­fit is clear and large in those pa­tients who are sick enough to re­quire oxy­gen treat­ment, so dex­am­etha­sone should now be­come stan­dard of care in these pa­tients. Dex­am­etha­sone is in­ex­pen­sive, on the shelf, and can be used im­me­di­ate­ly to save lives world­wide.”

“(I)t is fan­tas­tic that the first treat­ment demon­strat­ed to re­duce mor­tal­i­ty is one that is in­stant­ly avail­able and af­ford­able world­wide,” en­thused Ox­ford’s Mar­tin Lan­dray. — John Car­roll

BAR­DA puts $85M be­hind Re­gen­eron’s an­ti­body ef­fort

BAR­DA, the US biode­fense agency, is back­ing Re­gen­eron’s Covid-19 an­tivi­ral an­ti­body ef­fort with $85 mil­lion.

Al­though BAR­DA has al­ready promised over $2 bil­lion to ac­cel­er­ate and scale the de­vel­op­ment of Covid-19 vac­cines, but this is the largest tranche of fund­ing yet for a treat­ment ef­fort. BAR­DA worked with Re­gen­eron on their Ebo­la an­ti­body ef­fort – help­ing lead to one of the first two suc­cess­ful treat­ments for the virus in a tri­al last Au­gust – and the pair first an­nounced col­lab­o­ra­tion on a sim­i­lar ef­fort for Covid-19 in Feb­ru­ary.

The news of the fund­ing comes days af­ter Re­gen­eron put their first cock­tail of an­ti­bod­ies in the clin­ic. The Tar­ry­town-based biotech plans to even­tu­al­ly run 4 tri­als, 2 of them test­ing the drug as a treat­ment and 2 as a pro­phy­lac­tic.

HHS has al­so fund­ed an­ti­body ef­forts from As­traZeneca and SAb Bio­ther­a­peu­tics. Roche and J&J, among oth­ers, have re­ceived fund­ing for oth­er types of treat­ment. — Ja­son Mast

Pe­ter Kolchin­sky of­fers Covid-19 play­er No­vavax a thumbs up and $200M 

RA Cap­i­tal’s Pe­ter Kolchin­sky is back­ing No­vavax’s Covid-19 play, to the tune of $200 mil­lion.

A fund af­fil­i­at­ed with RA is buy­ing 4.4 mil­lion shares of stock $NVAX in the com­pa­ny at the June 12 clos­ing price.

Covid-19 has been a big help for No­vavax, which has had its share of clin­i­cal fail­ures to deal with. CEPI stepped up with its largest com­mit­ment to date, back­ing the biotech’s Phase I and Phase II tri­als for NVX-CoV2373 for up to $384 mil­lion while “dra­mat­i­cal­ly” in­creas­ing its pro­duc­tion ca­pac­i­ty for the vac­cine anti­gen as well as the ad­ju­vant need­ed to boost its ef­fi­ca­cy. That mon­ey was added on top of the $4 mil­lion CEPI sent No­vavax to get things go­ing in R&D with­out any de­lays for ne­go­ti­a­tions.

“The glob­al vac­cine ef­fort is search­ing for can­di­dates that are ca­pa­ble of both gen­er­at­ing the high­est neu­tral­iz­ing an­ti­body titers and large-scale pro­duc­tion. We are ex­cit­ed to in­crease our in­vest­ment in No­vavax, which along with re­sources from CEPI and the U.S. De­part­ment of De­fense, will sup­port No­vavax in its im­por­tant work de­vel­op­ing an ef­fec­tive, scal­able vac­cine for SARS-CoV-2,” said Kolchin­sky in a state­ment. — John Car­roll

Sanofi sets aside $679M cash for new vac­cine sites in France

As Sanofi push­es its par­al­lel R&D ef­forts on a pair of Covid-19 vac­cine can­di­dates, the French drug­mak­er said it would pour $679.4 mil­lion (€610 mil­lion) in­to two vac­cine sites on its home turf.

The com­mit­ment to “make France its world class cen­ter of ex­cel­lence” comes just weeks af­ter CEO Paul Hud­son, a Brit, drew the ire of French min­is­ters by say­ing in an in­ter­view that the US gov­ern­ment “has the right to the largest pre-or­der be­cause it’s in­vest­ed in tak­ing the risk” — a com­ment Sanofi swift­ly walked back.

“Sanofi’s heart beats in France,” Hud­son said in a pre­pared state­ment. “Sanofi is a ma­jor health­care play­er in France, in Eu­rope, and world­wide. It is our re­spon­si­bil­i­ty to fo­cus our re­sources and ex­per­tise against the cur­rent pan­dem­ic, but al­so to in­vest in prepar­ing for fu­ture ones.”.

French au­thor­i­ties have been work­ing with Sanofi the last sev­er­al months to achieve this, he added, in a com­ment that echoed Ger­many’s de­ci­sion to buy a stake of mR­NA biotech Cure­Vac with €300 mil­lion in fed­er­al mon­ey. And Pres­i­dent Em­manuel Macron came through with a pledge of €200 mil­lion to fu­el do­mes­tic re­search and man­u­fac­tur­ing, a boost Hud­son has been ad­vo­cat­ing for.

“Every­body saw that dur­ing this cri­sis some com­mon­ly used drugs were no longer pro­duced in France and Eu­rope. So we must no longer just ask ques­tions, but draw the con­clu­sions,” Macron said at Sanofi’s Mar­cy-L’Étoile fa­cil­i­ty.

At the same time — and it might have been drowned out by the Syn­thorx buy­out and dra­mat­ic cuts in the car­dio and di­a­betes units — the com­pa­ny re­mind­ed read­ers of the press re­lease that vac­cines were iden­ti­fied as a key area for growth in the cor­po­rate strat­e­gy Hud­son laid out last year.

Sanofi plans to build a vac­cine pro­duc­tion site at Neuville-sur-Saône and a re­search cen­ter at Mar­cy-l’Étoile, cre­at­ing a whole chain from R&D to man­u­fac­tur­ing with­in the coun­try.

The for­mer fa­cil­i­ty will cost an es­ti­mat­ed €490 mil­lion over five years and is ex­pect­ed to cre­ate 200 new jobs. The lat­ter will fo­cus on de­vel­op­ing fu­ture vac­cines, with high­ly-spe­cial­ized labs fo­cused on emerg­ing dis­eases and pan­dem­ic risks. — Am­ber Tong

Im­pe­r­i­al Col­lege of Lon­don preps Phase I tri­al of mR­NA vac­cine

A new mR­NA vac­cine ef­fort is en­ter­ing the clin­ic.

Three months af­ter Mod­er­na be­gan hu­man Covid-19 vac­cine test­ing with an mR­NA can­di­date, a can­di­date based on sim­i­lar tech­nol­o­gy from the Im­pe­r­i­al Col­lege of Lon­don will go in­to an ear­ly-stage tri­al this week, Reuters re­port­ed.

Un­like vir­tu­al­ly every oth­er clin­i­cal-stage Covid-19 vac­cine, the Im­pe­r­i­al Col­lege does not have a ma­jor in­dus­try part­ner. In­stead they’ve re­ceived over $56.5 mil­lion in fund­ing from par­lia­ment and donors, and have set up a new ven­ture for com­mer­cial­iz­ing the vac­cine should it prove safe and ef­fec­tive.

Al­though sim­i­lar in prin­ci­ple to Mod­er­na’s can­di­date — putting the ge­net­ic code for a coro­n­avirus pro­tein in­to hu­man cells, which ex­press the pro­tein and trig­ger an im­mune re­sponse — the col­lege’s tech­nol­o­gy dif­fers in key ways. Called small-am­pli­fy­ing RNA, the ge­net­ic code in the vac­cine will repli­cate it­self in­side cells, al­low­ing for much small­er dos­es and thus a po­ten­tial­ly much broad­er scale. It was de­vel­oped in part by Robin Shat­tock, who has al­so de­signed the Covid-19 can­di­date.

To com­mer­cial­ize the vac­cine, the col­lege set up a new com­pa­ny called VacE­quity Glob­al Health with the Hong Kong-based in­vest­ment firm Morn­ing­side Ven­tures. Its goal will be to make the vac­cine as wide­ly avail­able as pos­si­ble, while still turn­ing a prof­it — pos­si­bly by sell­ing for slight­ly high­er prices in high-in­come than low-in­come coun­tries.

The vac­cine will be one of sev­er­al that en­ter the clin­ic in the com­ing weeks and months. Cure­Vac, one of the first biotechs to be­gin de­vel­op­ing a vac­cine and which al­so us­es mR­NA, said ear­ly in the pan­dem­ic that they would aim for tri­als in June. And to­day sci­en­tists in Sin­ga­pore said they would be­gin test­ing an mR­NA vac­cine from the US biotech Arc­turus in Au­gust. — Ja­son Mast

As­traZeneca re­veals more of man­u­fac­tur­ing plan, adds an­oth­er part­ner

The streak of man­u­fac­tur­ing and sup­ply deals As­traZeneca has struck for Ox­ford’s Covid-19 vac­cine, cou­pled with rapid progress on the clin­i­cal front, ap­pears to have em­bold­ened the com­pa­ny in di­al­ing up its hopes, with CEO Pas­cal So­ri­ot pre­dict­ing that the pro­tec­tion would last for about a year, as re­port­ed by Reuters.

Un­der ide­al cir­cum­stances — which would in­volve enough vol­un­teers giv­en place­bo get in­fect­ed by the coro­n­avirus — re­sults of the on­go­ing Phase III tri­als will be ready in Au­gust or Sep­tem­ber.

“We are man­u­fac­tur­ing in par­al­lel,” he added. “We will be ready to de­liv­er from Oc­to­ber if all goes well.”

Through a glob­al net­work of part­ners, As­traZeneca said it’s se­cured ca­pac­i­ty for 2 bil­lion dos­es through 2021. A grow­ing list of part­ners have re­served more than half of that col­lec­tive­ly: 400 mil­lion dos­es for Eu­rope in its lat­est deal with France, Ger­many, Italy and the Nether­lands; 300 mil­lion for the US; 100 mil­lion for the UK; and 400 mil­lion to low- and mid­dle-in­come coun­tries by the end of the year.

On Tues­day the phar­ma gi­ant added Co­bra Bi­o­log­ics to the con­trac­tor fold, task­ing the UK man­u­fac­tur­er with pro­vid­ing GMP man­u­fac­ture of the vac­cine can­di­date AZD1222.

Co­bra had be­gun work­ing with Ox­ford’s Jen­ner In­sti­tute in March, be­fore As­traZeneca jumped on board with its pow­er­house in­fra­struc­ture. The sci­en­tists who de­vel­oped the re­com­bi­nant ade­n­ovirus vec­tor im­mu­niza­tion were think­ing about mass pro­duc­tion ear­ly on; some of the com­pa­nies that they had tapped for their man­u­fac­tur­ing con­sor­tium, such as Ox­ford Bio­med­ica, have since teamed up with As­traZeneca.

“The agree­ment with As­traZeneca comes at an op­por­tune time for us as we bring three ad­di­tion­al vi­ral vec­tor suites on­line as part of our on­go­ing ad­vanced ther­a­pies ex­pan­sion pro­gramme,” Pe­ter Cole­man, chief ex­ec­u­tive at Co­bra, said in a state­ment. — Am­ber Tong

For a look at all End­points News coro­n­avirus sto­ries, check out our spe­cial news chan­nel.

Biotech in­vestors and CEOs see two paths to growth, but are they equal­ly vi­able?

The dynamic in the biotech market has been highly volatile in the last few years, from the high peaks immediately after the COVID vaccine in 2021, to the lowest downturns of the last 20 years in 2022. This uncertainty makes calling the exact timing of the market’s turn something of a fool’s errand, according to Dr. Chen Yu, Founder and Managing Partner of TCG Crossover (TCG X). He speaks with RBC’s Noël Brown, Head of US Biotechnology Investment Banking, about the market’s road ahead and two possible paths for growth.

Casey McPherson shows his daughters Rose (left) and Weston around Everlum Bio, a lab that he co-founded to spark a treatment for Rose and others with ultra-rare conditions. (Ilana Panich-Linsman)

Fa­ther starts lab af­ter in­tel­lec­tu­al prop­er­ty is­sues stymie rare dis­ease drug de­vel­op­ment

Under bright lab lights, Casey McPherson holds his 6-year-old daughter, Rose. His free hand directs Rose’s gaze toward a computer screen with potential clues in treating her one-of-a kind genetic condition.

Gray specks on the screen show her cells that scientists reprogrammed with the goal of zeroing in on a custom medicine. McPherson co-founded the lab, Everlum Bio, to spark a treatment for Rose — and others like her. A regarded singer-songwriter, McPherson never imagined going into drug development.

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Fireside chat between Hal Barron and John Carroll, UKBIO19

It’s time we talked about bio­phar­ma — live in Lon­don next week

Zoom can only go so far. And I think at this stage, we’ve all tested the limits of staying in touch — virtually. So I’m particularly happy now that we’ve revved up the travel machine to point myself to London for the first time in several years.

Whatever events we have lined up, we’ve always built in plenty of opportunities for all of us to get together and talk. For London, live, I plan to be right out front, meeting with and chatting with the small crowd of biopharma people we are hosting on October 12 at Silicon Valley Bank’s London headquarters. And there’s a lengthy mixer at the end I’m most looking forward to, with several networking openings between sessions.

Take­da to pull key hy­poparathy­roidism drug from the mar­ket af­ter years of man­u­fac­tur­ing woes

Takeda on Tuesday morning made an announcement that almost 3,000 people with the rare disease known as hypoparathyroidism were fearing.

Due to unresolved supply issues and manufacturing woes, Takeda said it will cut its losses and discontinue its hypoparathyroidism drug, known as Natpara (parathyroid hormone), halting all manufacturing of the drug by the end of 2024, but the entire inventory will be available until depleted or expired, a company spokesperson said via email.

Pfizer and BioNTech's original Marvel comic book links evolving Covid vaccine science to Avengers' evolving villain-fighting tools.(Source: Pfizer LinkedIn post)

Pfiz­er, BioN­Tech part­ner with Mar­vel for Avengers and Covid-fight­ing com­ic book

Pfizer and BioNTech are collaborating with Marvel to celebrate “everyday” people getting Covid-19 vaccines in a custom comic book.

In the “Everyday Heroes” digital comic book, an evolving Ultron, one of the Avengers’ leading villains, is defeated by Captain America, Ironman and others. The plotline and history of Ultron is explained by a grandfather who is waiting with his family at a clinic for Covid-19 vaccinations.

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FDA+ roundup: Ad­comm date set for Cy­to­ki­net­ics heart drug; New gener­ic drug guid­ance to re­duce fa­cil­i­ty de­lays

The FDA on Wednesday set Dec. 13 as the day that its Cardiovascular and Renal Drugs Advisory Committee will review Cytokinetics’ potential heart drug, meaning regulators aren’t likely to meet the Nov. 30 PDUFA date that was previously set.

The drug, known as omecamtiv mecarbil, read out its first Phase III in November 2020, hitting the primary endpoint of reducing the odds of hospitalization or other urgent care for heart failure by 8%. But it also missed a key secondary endpoint analysts had pegged as the key to breaking into the market, failing to significantly differ in reducing cardiovascular death from placebo.

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David Cory, Eiger BioPharmaceuticals CEO (via MultiVu)

FDA re­jects Eiger's emer­gency use re­quest for re­pur­posed Covid-19 treat­ment

Eiger BioPharmaceuticals is no longer planning to submit an emergency use application to the FDA.

The Palo Alto, CA-based biotech had hoped to repurpose its hepatitis D treatment, peginterferon lambda, for mild-to-moderate Covid-19 — submitting a request to the FDA for a pre-EUA meeting back in September with data from a Phase III platform trial in hand.

However, that meeting was rejected by federal regulators because of “concerns about the conduct of the TOGETHER study,” per an Eiger statement.

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Af­ter Covid set­back, Val­ne­va lines up $100M for Pfiz­er-al­lied Ly­me dis­ease PhI­II

Valneva has secured €102.9 million (around $99.9 million USD) in a share offering to push forward its Pfizer-partnered Lyme disease vaccine and a jab for chikungunya that awaits an FDA decision.

The French vaccine maker largely snagged the near $100 million from Deep Track Capital and local state-owned Bpifrance, the company said Tuesday night. The capital injection is nearly equal to the amount Pfizer paid to nab equity in the company earlier this summer as part of the duo’s vaccine tie-up.

Car­olyn Bertozzi (Illustration: Assistant editor Kathy Wong for Endpoints News)

Car­olyn Bertozzi, re­peat biotech founder and launch­er of a field, shares in chem­istry No­bel win

Carolyn Bertozzi, predicted by some to become a Nobel laureate, clinched one of the world’s top awards in the wee hours of Wednesday, winning the Nobel Prize in Chemistry alongside a repeat winner and a Copenhagen researcher.

The Stanford professor, Morten Meldal of University of Copenhagen and 2001-awardee K. Barry Sharpless of Scripps shared the prize equally. The Nobel is sometimes split in quarters and/or halves.