Covid-19 roundup: An old, cheap steroid proves to be a ma­jor boon to coro­n­avirus pa­tients; BAR­DA puts $85M be­hind Re­gen­eron an­ti­body ef­fort

Re­searchers to­day spot­light­ed da­ta from a clin­i­cal study of­fer­ing the first hard ev­i­dence that a treat­ment can save the lives of pa­tients suf­fer­ing from Covid-19.

The old gener­ic dex­am­etha­sone was tied to a one-third re­duc­tion of deaths among ven­ti­lat­ed pa­tients with a one-fifth re­duc­tion in mor­tal­i­ty among a group get­ting oxy­gen. There was no ben­e­fit for pa­tients who did not re­quire res­pi­ra­to­ry as­sis­tance.

“Dex­am­etha­sone is the first drug to be shown to im­prove sur­vival in COVID-19,” not­ed Pe­ter Hor­by, an Ox­ford pro­fes­sor and a chief in­ves­ti­ga­tor in the tri­al. “This is an ex­treme­ly wel­come re­sult. The sur­vival ben­e­fit is clear and large in those pa­tients who are sick enough to re­quire oxy­gen treat­ment, so dex­am­etha­sone should now be­come stan­dard of care in these pa­tients. Dex­am­etha­sone is in­ex­pen­sive, on the shelf, and can be used im­me­di­ate­ly to save lives world­wide.”

“(I)t is fan­tas­tic that the first treat­ment demon­strat­ed to re­duce mor­tal­i­ty is one that is in­stant­ly avail­able and af­ford­able world­wide,” en­thused Ox­ford’s Mar­tin Lan­dray. — John Car­roll

BAR­DA puts $85M be­hind Re­gen­eron’s an­ti­body ef­fort

BAR­DA, the US biode­fense agency, is back­ing Re­gen­eron’s Covid-19 an­tivi­ral an­ti­body ef­fort with $85 mil­lion.

Al­though BAR­DA has al­ready promised over $2 bil­lion to ac­cel­er­ate and scale the de­vel­op­ment of Covid-19 vac­cines, but this is the largest tranche of fund­ing yet for a treat­ment ef­fort. BAR­DA worked with Re­gen­eron on their Ebo­la an­ti­body ef­fort – help­ing lead to one of the first two suc­cess­ful treat­ments for the virus in a tri­al last Au­gust – and the pair first an­nounced col­lab­o­ra­tion on a sim­i­lar ef­fort for Covid-19 in Feb­ru­ary.

The news of the fund­ing comes days af­ter Re­gen­eron put their first cock­tail of an­ti­bod­ies in the clin­ic. The Tar­ry­town-based biotech plans to even­tu­al­ly run 4 tri­als, 2 of them test­ing the drug as a treat­ment and 2 as a pro­phy­lac­tic.

HHS has al­so fund­ed an­ti­body ef­forts from As­traZeneca and SAb Bio­ther­a­peu­tics. Roche and J&J, among oth­ers, have re­ceived fund­ing for oth­er types of treat­ment. — Ja­son Mast

Pe­ter Kolchin­sky of­fers Covid-19 play­er No­vavax a thumbs up and $200M 

RA Cap­i­tal’s Pe­ter Kolchin­sky is back­ing No­vavax’s Covid-19 play, to the tune of $200 mil­lion.

A fund af­fil­i­at­ed with RA is buy­ing 4.4 mil­lion shares of stock $NVAX in the com­pa­ny at the June 12 clos­ing price.

Covid-19 has been a big help for No­vavax, which has had its share of clin­i­cal fail­ures to deal with. CEPI stepped up with its largest com­mit­ment to date, back­ing the biotech’s Phase I and Phase II tri­als for NVX-CoV2373 for up to $384 mil­lion while “dra­mat­i­cal­ly” in­creas­ing its pro­duc­tion ca­pac­i­ty for the vac­cine anti­gen as well as the ad­ju­vant need­ed to boost its ef­fi­ca­cy. That mon­ey was added on top of the $4 mil­lion CEPI sent No­vavax to get things go­ing in R&D with­out any de­lays for ne­go­ti­a­tions.

“The glob­al vac­cine ef­fort is search­ing for can­di­dates that are ca­pa­ble of both gen­er­at­ing the high­est neu­tral­iz­ing an­ti­body titers and large-scale pro­duc­tion. We are ex­cit­ed to in­crease our in­vest­ment in No­vavax, which along with re­sources from CEPI and the U.S. De­part­ment of De­fense, will sup­port No­vavax in its im­por­tant work de­vel­op­ing an ef­fec­tive, scal­able vac­cine for SARS-CoV-2,” said Kolchin­sky in a state­ment. — John Car­roll

Sanofi sets aside $679M cash for new vac­cine sites in France

As Sanofi push­es its par­al­lel R&D ef­forts on a pair of Covid-19 vac­cine can­di­dates, the French drug­mak­er said it would pour $679.4 mil­lion (€610 mil­lion) in­to two vac­cine sites on its home turf.

The com­mit­ment to “make France its world class cen­ter of ex­cel­lence” comes just weeks af­ter CEO Paul Hud­son, a Brit, drew the ire of French min­is­ters by say­ing in an in­ter­view that the US gov­ern­ment “has the right to the largest pre-or­der be­cause it’s in­vest­ed in tak­ing the risk” — a com­ment Sanofi swift­ly walked back.

“Sanofi’s heart beats in France,” Hud­son said in a pre­pared state­ment. “Sanofi is a ma­jor health­care play­er in France, in Eu­rope, and world­wide. It is our re­spon­si­bil­i­ty to fo­cus our re­sources and ex­per­tise against the cur­rent pan­dem­ic, but al­so to in­vest in prepar­ing for fu­ture ones.”.

French au­thor­i­ties have been work­ing with Sanofi the last sev­er­al months to achieve this, he added, in a com­ment that echoed Ger­many’s de­ci­sion to buy a stake of mR­NA biotech Cure­Vac with €300 mil­lion in fed­er­al mon­ey. And Pres­i­dent Em­manuel Macron came through with a pledge of €200 mil­lion to fu­el do­mes­tic re­search and man­u­fac­tur­ing, a boost Hud­son has been ad­vo­cat­ing for.

“Every­body saw that dur­ing this cri­sis some com­mon­ly used drugs were no longer pro­duced in France and Eu­rope. So we must no longer just ask ques­tions, but draw the con­clu­sions,” Macron said at Sanofi’s Mar­cy-L’Étoile fa­cil­i­ty.

At the same time — and it might have been drowned out by the Syn­thorx buy­out and dra­mat­ic cuts in the car­dio and di­a­betes units — the com­pa­ny re­mind­ed read­ers of the press re­lease that vac­cines were iden­ti­fied as a key area for growth in the cor­po­rate strat­e­gy Hud­son laid out last year.

Sanofi plans to build a vac­cine pro­duc­tion site at Neuville-sur-Saône and a re­search cen­ter at Mar­cy-l’Étoile, cre­at­ing a whole chain from R&D to man­u­fac­tur­ing with­in the coun­try.

The for­mer fa­cil­i­ty will cost an es­ti­mat­ed €490 mil­lion over five years and is ex­pect­ed to cre­ate 200 new jobs. The lat­ter will fo­cus on de­vel­op­ing fu­ture vac­cines, with high­ly-spe­cial­ized labs fo­cused on emerg­ing dis­eases and pan­dem­ic risks. — Am­ber Tong

Im­pe­r­i­al Col­lege of Lon­don preps Phase I tri­al of mR­NA vac­cine

A new mR­NA vac­cine ef­fort is en­ter­ing the clin­ic.

Three months af­ter Mod­er­na be­gan hu­man Covid-19 vac­cine test­ing with an mR­NA can­di­date, a can­di­date based on sim­i­lar tech­nol­o­gy from the Im­pe­r­i­al Col­lege of Lon­don will go in­to an ear­ly-stage tri­al this week, Reuters re­port­ed.

Un­like vir­tu­al­ly every oth­er clin­i­cal-stage Covid-19 vac­cine, the Im­pe­r­i­al Col­lege does not have a ma­jor in­dus­try part­ner. In­stead they’ve re­ceived over $56.5 mil­lion in fund­ing from par­lia­ment and donors, and have set up a new ven­ture for com­mer­cial­iz­ing the vac­cine should it prove safe and ef­fec­tive.

Al­though sim­i­lar in prin­ci­ple to Mod­er­na’s can­di­date — putting the ge­net­ic code for a coro­n­avirus pro­tein in­to hu­man cells, which ex­press the pro­tein and trig­ger an im­mune re­sponse — the col­lege’s tech­nol­o­gy dif­fers in key ways. Called small-am­pli­fy­ing RNA, the ge­net­ic code in the vac­cine will repli­cate it­self in­side cells, al­low­ing for much small­er dos­es and thus a po­ten­tial­ly much broad­er scale. It was de­vel­oped in part by Robin Shat­tock, who has al­so de­signed the Covid-19 can­di­date.

To com­mer­cial­ize the vac­cine, the col­lege set up a new com­pa­ny called VacE­quity Glob­al Health with the Hong Kong-based in­vest­ment firm Morn­ing­side Ven­tures. Its goal will be to make the vac­cine as wide­ly avail­able as pos­si­ble, while still turn­ing a prof­it — pos­si­bly by sell­ing for slight­ly high­er prices in high-in­come than low-in­come coun­tries.

The vac­cine will be one of sev­er­al that en­ter the clin­ic in the com­ing weeks and months. Cure­Vac, one of the first biotechs to be­gin de­vel­op­ing a vac­cine and which al­so us­es mR­NA, said ear­ly in the pan­dem­ic that they would aim for tri­als in June. And to­day sci­en­tists in Sin­ga­pore said they would be­gin test­ing an mR­NA vac­cine from the US biotech Arc­turus in Au­gust. — Ja­son Mast

As­traZeneca re­veals more of man­u­fac­tur­ing plan, adds an­oth­er part­ner

The streak of man­u­fac­tur­ing and sup­ply deals As­traZeneca has struck for Ox­ford’s Covid-19 vac­cine, cou­pled with rapid progress on the clin­i­cal front, ap­pears to have em­bold­ened the com­pa­ny in di­al­ing up its hopes, with CEO Pas­cal So­ri­ot pre­dict­ing that the pro­tec­tion would last for about a year, as re­port­ed by Reuters.

Un­der ide­al cir­cum­stances — which would in­volve enough vol­un­teers giv­en place­bo get in­fect­ed by the coro­n­avirus — re­sults of the on­go­ing Phase III tri­als will be ready in Au­gust or Sep­tem­ber.

“We are man­u­fac­tur­ing in par­al­lel,” he added. “We will be ready to de­liv­er from Oc­to­ber if all goes well.”

Through a glob­al net­work of part­ners, As­traZeneca said it’s se­cured ca­pac­i­ty for 2 bil­lion dos­es through 2021. A grow­ing list of part­ners have re­served more than half of that col­lec­tive­ly: 400 mil­lion dos­es for Eu­rope in its lat­est deal with France, Ger­many, Italy and the Nether­lands; 300 mil­lion for the US; 100 mil­lion for the UK; and 400 mil­lion to low- and mid­dle-in­come coun­tries by the end of the year.

On Tues­day the phar­ma gi­ant added Co­bra Bi­o­log­ics to the con­trac­tor fold, task­ing the UK man­u­fac­tur­er with pro­vid­ing GMP man­u­fac­ture of the vac­cine can­di­date AZD1222.

Co­bra had be­gun work­ing with Ox­ford’s Jen­ner In­sti­tute in March, be­fore As­traZeneca jumped on board with its pow­er­house in­fra­struc­ture. The sci­en­tists who de­vel­oped the re­com­bi­nant ade­n­ovirus vec­tor im­mu­niza­tion were think­ing about mass pro­duc­tion ear­ly on; some of the com­pa­nies that they had tapped for their man­u­fac­tur­ing con­sor­tium, such as Ox­ford Bio­med­ica, have since teamed up with As­traZeneca.

“The agree­ment with As­traZeneca comes at an op­por­tune time for us as we bring three ad­di­tion­al vi­ral vec­tor suites on­line as part of our on­go­ing ad­vanced ther­a­pies ex­pan­sion pro­gramme,” Pe­ter Cole­man, chief ex­ec­u­tive at Co­bra, said in a state­ment. — Am­ber Tong

For a look at all End­points News coro­n­avirus sto­ries, check out our spe­cial news chan­nel.

A new era of treat­ment: How bio­mark­ers are chang­ing the way we think about can­cer

AJ Patel was recovering from a complicated brain surgery when his oncologist burst into the hospital room yelling, “I’ve got some really great news for you!”

For two years, Patel had been going from doctor to doctor trying to diagnose his wheezing, only to be dealt the devastating news that he had stage IV lung cancer and only six months to live. And then they found the brain tumors.

“What are you talking about?” Patel asked. He had never seen an oncologist so happy.

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Mod­er­na seeks to dis­miss Al­ny­lam suit over Covid-19 vac­cine com­po­nent, claim­ing wrong venue

RNAi therapeutics juggernaut Alnylam Pharmaceuticals made a splash in March when it sued and sought money from both Pfizer and Moderna regarding their use of Alnylam’s biodegradable lipids, which Alnylam claims have been integral to the way both companies’ mRNA-based Covid-19 vaccines work.

But now, Moderna lawyers are firing back, telling the same Delaware district court that Alnylam’s claims can only proceed against the US government in the Court of Federal Claims because of the way the company’s contract is set up with the US government. The US has spent almost $10 billion on Moderna’s Covid-19 vaccine so far.

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Özlem Türeci, BioNTech co-founder and Uğur Şahin, BioNTech CEO

Third dose bumps up ef­fi­ca­cy of Pfiz­er-BioN­Tech's Covid-19 vac­cine in youngest group of chil­dren to 80%

Pfizer and BioNTech said Monday that they’re ready to approach the FDA this week with early data for their booster shot for Covid-19 vaccine in the youngest age group (6 months to under 5 years), which showed 80.3% efficacy based on 10 symptomatic Covid cases identified beginning seven days after the third dose.

“The study suggests that a low 3-ug dose of our vaccine, carefully selected based on tolerability data, provides young children with a high level of protection against the recent COVID-19 strains,” Uğur Şahin, CEO and co-founder of BioNTech said in a statement. “We are preparing the relevant documents and expect completing the submission process to the FDA this week, with submissions to EMA and other regulatory agencies to follow within the coming weeks.”

Mihael Polymeropoulos, Vanda Pharmaceuticals CEO

Phar­ma com­pa­ny con­tin­ues its FDA law­suit spree, this time af­ter agency de­nies fast-track des­ig­na­tion

Vanda Pharmaceuticals is making a name for itself, at least in terms of suing the FDA.

The DC-headquartered firm on Monday filed its latest suit against the agency, with the company raising concerns over the FDA’s failure to grant a fast track designation for Vanda’s potential chronic digestive disorder drug tradipitant, which is a neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist.

Specifically, Vanda said FDA’s “essential point” in its one-page denial letter on the designation pointed to “the lack of necessary safety data,” which was “inconsistent with the criteria for … Fast Track designation.”

(Credit: Shutterstock)

Cracks in the fa­cade: Is phar­ma's pan­dem­ic ‘feel good fac­tor’ wan­ing?

The discordant effects of the Covid-19 pandemic on pharma reputation continues. While the overall industry still retains a respectable halo from its Covid-19 quick response and leadership, a new patient group study reveals a different story emerging in the details.

On one hand, US patient advocacy groups rated the industry higher-than-ever overall. More than two-thirds (67%) of groups gave the industry a thumbs up for 2021, a whopping 10 percentage point increase over the year before, according to the PatientView annual study, now in its 9th year.

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Adar Poonawalla, Serum Institute of India CEO (Dhiraj Singh/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Covid-19 roundup: Serum In­sti­tute eyes Africa for glob­al ex­pan­sion — re­port; Jun­shi an­tivi­ral hits pri­ma­ry end­point in late-stage tri­al

After Serum Institute CEO Adar Poonawalla announced last month that the world’s largest vaccine maker stopped producing doses of Covid-19 vaccines back in December, the institute is looking to expand.

The CEO told Reuters Monday that the company is considering establishing its first manufacturing plant in Africa in its next step toward global expansion after successfully mass producing and selling hundreds of millions of Covid-19 vaccine doses out of its India-based facilities.

Michael Corbo, Pfizer CDO of inflammation & immunology

UP­DAT­ED: Plan­ning ahead for crowd­ed ul­cer­a­tive col­i­tis mar­ket, Pfiz­er spells out PhI­II da­ta on $6.7B Are­na drug

Pfizer has laid out the detailed results behind its boast that etrasimod — the S1P receptor modulator at the center of its $6.7 billion buyout of Arena Pharma — is the winner of the class, potentially leapfrogging an earlier entrant from Bristol Myers Squibb.

Pivotal data from the ELEVATE program in ulcerative colitis — which consists of two Phase III trials, one lasting 52 weeks and the other just 12 weeks — illustrate an “encouraging balance of efficacy and safety,” according to Michael Corbo, chief development officer of inflammation & immunology at Pfizer. The company is presenting the results as a late breaker at Digestive Disease Week.

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Robert Califf (Michael Brochstein/Sipa USA via AP Images)

House Re­pub­li­cans at­tack Chi­na-on­ly da­ta in FDA sub­mis­sions, seek new in­ves­ti­ga­tion in­to re­search in­spec­tions

Three Republican representatives are calling on the FDA to take a closer look at the applications including only clinical data from China.

The letter to FDA commissioner Rob Califf late last week comes as the agency recently rejected Eli Lilly’s anti-PD-1 antibody, which attempted to bring China-only data but ran into a bruising adcomm that may crush the hopes of any other companies looking to bring cheaper follow-ons based only on Chinese data.

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Amid mon­key­pox fears, biotechs spring to ac­tion; Mod­er­na’s CFO trou­ble; Cuts, cuts every­where; Craft­ing the right pro­teins; and more

Welcome back to Endpoints Weekly, your review of the week’s top biopharma headlines. Want this in your inbox every Saturday morning? Current Endpoints readers can visit their reader profile to add Endpoints Weekly. New to Endpoints? Sign up here.

It’s always a bittersweet moment saying goodbye, but as Josh Sullivan goes off to new adventures we are grateful for the way he’s built up the Endpoints Manufacturing section — which the rest of the team will now carry forward. If you’re not already, this may be a good time to sign up for your weekly dose of drug manufacturing news. Thank you for reading and wish you a restful weekend.