Months af­ter $10M Se­ries A, rare dis­ease AI up­start Healx hauls in $56M in fresh fund­ing

In 2010, Nick Sireau quit his job to fo­cus sole­ly on the pa­tient group he had set up to help his sons di­ag­nosed with a rare ge­net­ic dis­ease called alka­p­tonuria (AKU). Re­searchers had found a fea­si­ble treat­ment from an un­like­ly source: a weed­killer, but it was be­ing used to help in­fants with a dif­fer­ent dis­or­der. Sireau would then con­front the per­ils of the tra­di­tion­al tri­al-and-er­ror drug dis­cov­ery process that de­mands time and mon­ey.

Tim Guil­liams

In 2014, two sci­en­tists met Sireau, who had been fierce­ly lob­by­ing and fundrais­ing to get UK au­thor­i­ties to tri­al the com­pound in pa­tients with AKU. The en­counter sparked the two re­searchers — the British sci­en­tist be­hind Vi­a­gra, David Brown, and a bio­engi­neer from Cam­bridge, Tim Guil­liams — to work on mar­ry­ing the con­cept of drug re­pur­pos­ing with AI and ma­chine learn­ing, par­tic­u­lar­ly for rare con­di­tions. Soon, their com­pa­ny — Healx — was born.

This Ju­ly, the Cam­bridge, UK-based com­pa­ny raised $10 mil­lion in a Se­ries A round of fund­ing. On Wednes­day, Healx un­veiled a fresh $56 mil­lion in­jec­tion — as it preps for a Phase IIa clin­i­cal tri­al ex­pect­ed to ini­ti­ate in the first quar­ter of 2020 — in pa­tients with Frag­ile X syn­drome, a con­di­tion that spawns de­vel­op­men­tal prob­lems and is con­sid­ered the lead­ing ge­net­ic cause of autism.

Nick Sireau

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The tri­al will eval­u­ate the safe­ty and ef­fi­ca­cy of a com­bi­na­tion ther­a­py, Guil­liams told End­points News, de­clin­ing to pro­vide fur­ther de­tail.

“If you look at com­bi­na­tions of two or three drugs, you have about 13 bil­lion pos­si­bil­i­ties per dis­ease — so how do you se­lect the top 10, the top 20? And we don’t go be­yond that,” Guil­liams said. Healx’s AI plat­form claims to short­en the dis­cov­ery-to-clin­ic time­line to as lit­tle as 24 months.

David Brown

Healx’s ap­proach does not lean on an ini­tial hy­poth­e­sis. “We let the al­go­rithm de­cide which dis­eases we’re go­ing to work on, which drugs are be­ing matched. And then we work out a mech­a­nism or hy­poth­e­sis af­ter­wards,” he said.

So far, Healx has launched 10 pre­clin­i­cal pro­grams across a pletho­ra of in­di­ca­tions — of which four (in­clud­ing the Frag­ile X pro­gram) have reaped re­sults so far, Guil­liams said, not­ing that each of these read­outs has been pos­i­tive. With this Se­ries B, the plan is to launch an­oth­er 40 pre­clin­i­cal pro­grams, he added.

If they are suc­cess­ful — with any of these shots on goal — the plan is to make sure pric­ing is not in the typ­i­cal or­phan drug price range which hov­ers around $240,000 per pa­tient per year, Guil­liams said.

Re­pur­pos­ing drugs on pur­pose (or by ac­ci­dent) has yield­ed some suc­cess — that the process in­volves large­ly de-risked com­pounds, low­er de­vel­op­men­tal costs, and briefer time­lines doesn’t hurt ei­ther.

Vi­a­gra is, of course, the most heav­i­ly cit­ed ex­am­ple. The drug, known chem­i­cal­ly as silde­nafil, was orig­i­nal­ly be­ing test­ed as a treat­ment for coro­nary hy­per­ten­sion — but a pesky side ef­fect felt by pa­tients in tri­als led to its even­tu­al ap­proval as an erec­tile dys­func­tion drug.

Then there’s the seda­tive thalido­mide — which gained no­to­ri­ety af­ter its link to se­vere skele­tal birth de­fects trig­gered its with­draw­al in 1957. How­ev­er, years lat­er it was deemed ef­fec­tive as a can­cer treat­ment, even breed­ing the de­vel­op­ment and ap­proval of even more suc­cess­ful de­riv­a­tives, such as Cel­gene’s block­buster Revlim­id.

Mean­while, Mer­ck’s Vioxx — which was un­cer­e­mo­ni­ous­ly tak­en off shelves af­ter its link to dou­bling pa­tients’ risk of heart at­tack and stroke emerged — could resur­face as a gener­ic treat­ment for a side ef­fect ex­pe­ri­enced by he­mo­phil­ia pa­tients. The gener­ic ver­sion is be­ing prepped for a piv­otal tri­al slat­ed to be­gin next year.

But akin to tra­di­tion­al drug de­vel­op­ment, drug re­pur­pos­ing has al­so seen its share of set­backs. Two ex­am­ples of late-stage fail­ures in­clude the bid to use the an­ti­his­t­a­mine, la­trepir­dine, as a treat­ment for Hunt­ing­ton’s dis­ease, as well as the pur­suit of re­pur­pos­ing the an­tibi­ot­ic, cef­tri­ax­one, as a med­i­cine for ALS.

Healx’s Se­ries B was led by Eu­ro­pean VC firm Atom­i­co and joined by Glob­al Brain and btov Part­ners. All pre­vi­ous in­vestors, in­clud­ing Balder­ton Cap­i­tal, Amadeus Cap­i­tal Part­ners and Jonathan Mil­ner, al­so par­tic­i­pat­ed in the round.

Healx did not ini­tial­ly plan to raise more mon­ey this year, but in­ter­est in their ap­proach bal­looned giv­en their progress, Guil­liams said. “I think that’s a re­al­ly good sign for the in­vest­ment land­scape in the UK and Eu­rope be­cause for Eu­rope it’s a pret­ty large B round…com­pared to the US.”

“And I’m won­der­ing if part of that is let’s make sure we in­vest be­fore Brex­it kicks in.”

Biotech in­vestors and CEOs see two paths to growth, but are they equal­ly vi­able?

The dynamic in the biotech market has been highly volatile in the last few years, from the high peaks immediately after the COVID vaccine in 2021, to the lowest downturns of the last 20 years in 2022. This uncertainty makes calling the exact timing of the market’s turn something of a fool’s errand, according to Dr. Chen Yu, Founder and Managing Partner of TCG Crossover (TCG X). He speaks with RBC’s Noël Brown, Head of US Biotechnology Investment Banking, about the market’s road ahead and two possible paths for growth.

Casey McPherson shows his daughters Rose (left) and Weston around Everlum Bio, a lab that he co-founded to spark a treatment for Rose and others with ultra-rare conditions. (Ilana Panich-Linsman)

Fa­ther starts lab af­ter in­tel­lec­tu­al prop­er­ty is­sues stymie rare dis­ease drug de­vel­op­ment

Under bright lab lights, Casey McPherson holds his 6-year-old daughter, Rose. His free hand directs Rose’s gaze toward a computer screen with potential clues in treating her one-of-a kind genetic condition.

Gray specks on the screen show her cells that scientists reprogrammed with the goal of zeroing in on a custom medicine. McPherson co-founded the lab, Everlum Bio, to spark a treatment for Rose — and others like her. A regarded singer-songwriter, McPherson never imagined going into drug development.

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Vlad Coric, Biohaven CEO

Vlad Coric charts course for new Bio­haven with neu­ro­science push and Big Phar­ma vets on board

What’s Biohaven without its CGRP portfolio? That’s what CEO Vlad Coric is tasked with deciding as he maps out the new Biohaven post-Pfizer takeover.

Pfizer officially scooped up Biohaven’s CGRP assets on Monday, including blockbuster migraine drug Nurtec and the investigational zavegepant, for $11.6 billion. As a result, Coric spun the broader pipeline into an independent company on Tuesday — with the same R&D team behind Nurtec but about 1,000 fewer staffers and a renewed focus on neuroscience and rare disease.

In AstraZeneca's latest campaign, wild eosinophils called Phils personify the acting up often seen in uncontrolled asthma

As­traZeneca de­buts an­noy­ing pur­ple ‘Phil’ crea­tures, per­son­i­fied asth­ma eosinophils ‘be­hav­ing bad­ly’

There are some odd-looking purple creatures lurking around the halls of AstraZenca lately. The “Phil” character cutouts are purple, personified eosinophils with big buggy eyes and wide mouths, and they’re a part of AZ’s newest awareness effort to help people understand eosinophilic asthma.

The “Asthma Behaving Badly” characters aren’t only on the walls at AZ to show the new campaign to employees, however. The “Phils” are also showing up online on the campaign website, and in digital and social ads and posts on Facebook and Instagram.

Christophe Bourdon, Leo Pharma CEO

Leo Phar­ma looks 'be­yond the skin' in atopic der­mati­tis aware­ness cam­paign

As Leo Pharma aims to take on heavyweight champ Dupixent in atopic dermatitis, the company is launching “AD Days Around the World,” an awareness campaign documenting real patient stories across Europe.

The project, unveiled on Monday, spotlights four patients: Marjolaine, Laura, Julia and África from France, Italy, Germany and Spain, respectively, in short video clips on the challenges of living with AD, the most common form of eczema.

Marc Dunoyer, Alexion CEO (AstraZeneca via YouTube)

Up­dat­ed: As­traZeneca nabs a small rare dis­ease gene ther­a­py play­er for 667% pre­mi­um

AstraZeneca is kicking off the fourth quarter with a little M&A Monday for a gene editing player recently overcoming a second clinical hold to its only program in human studies.

The Big Pharma and its subsidiary Alexion are buying out little LogicBio for $2.07 per share. That’s good for a massive 667% premium over its Friday closing price, when it headed into the weekend at 27 cents and just weeks after Nasdaq said LogicBio would have to delist, which has been put on hold as the biotech requests a hearing. It’s one of two biotech deals to commence October, alongside the news of Incyte buying a vitiligo-focused biotech.

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Dave Marek, Myovant CEO

My­ovant board balks as ma­jor­i­ty own­er Sum­it­o­mo swoops in with a $2.5B deal to buy them out

Three years after Sumitomo scooped up Roivant’s 46% stake in the publicly traded Myovant $MYOV as part of a 5-company, $3 billion deal, they’re coming back for the whole thing.

But these other investors at Myovant want more than what the Japanese pharma company is currently offering to pay at this stage.

Sumitomo is bidding $22.75 a share for the outstanding stock, which now represents 48% of the company after Sumitomo bumped its ownership since the original deal with Roivant. Myovant, however, created a special committee on the board, and they’re shaking their heads over the offer.

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Ying Huang, Legend CEO

Lentivi­ral vec­tor ramp-up: J&J and Leg­end to in­vest $500M in New Jer­sey man­u­fac­tur­ing to sup­port Carvyk­ti

In response to a question on manufacturing scale at Legend Biotech’s R&D day yesterday, the company’s top exec said its partnership with Johnson & Johnson will be doubling its investment in its New Jersey manufacturing center and will be investing a total of $500 million.

With an eye on their BCMA-directed CAR-T therapy Carvykti (cilta-cel), approved in February as a fifth-line treatment for multiple myeloma, Legend CEO Ying Huang said that the ramp-up in production and the decision to manufacture its own lentiviral vectors — currently in shortage worldwide — means they won’t have to deal with that shortage.

Kite Phar­ma gets FDA to sign off on new Cal­i­for­nia-based vec­tor man­u­fac­tur­ing fa­cil­i­ty

Kite Pharma just got FDA approval to kick off operations at a new manufacturing campus.

The cancer-focused, CAR-T cell therapy player made the announcement Monday, saying that the federal regulatory agency gave the green light to Kite’s 100,000 square-foot, retroviral vector manufacturing facility in Oceanside, CA.

Kite’s global head of technical operations Chris McDonald tells Endpoints News that the facility has been in the works for about four years, after Kite teamed up with its parent company Gilead. Gilead acquired Kite Pharma for just shy of $12 billion in 2017.