Months af­ter $10M Se­ries A, rare dis­ease AI up­start Healx hauls in $56M in fresh fund­ing

In 2010, Nick Sireau quit his job to fo­cus sole­ly on the pa­tient group he had set up to help his sons di­ag­nosed with a rare ge­net­ic dis­ease called alka­p­tonuria (AKU). Re­searchers had found a fea­si­ble treat­ment from an un­like­ly source: a weed­killer, but it was be­ing used to help in­fants with a dif­fer­ent dis­or­der. Sireau would then con­front the per­ils of the tra­di­tion­al tri­al-and-er­ror drug dis­cov­ery process that de­mands time and mon­ey.

Tim Guil­liams

In 2014, two sci­en­tists met Sireau, who had been fierce­ly lob­by­ing and fundrais­ing to get UK au­thor­i­ties to tri­al the com­pound in pa­tients with AKU. The en­counter sparked the two re­searchers — the British sci­en­tist be­hind Vi­a­gra, David Brown, and a bio­engi­neer from Cam­bridge, Tim Guil­liams — to work on mar­ry­ing the con­cept of drug re­pur­pos­ing with AI and ma­chine learn­ing, par­tic­u­lar­ly for rare con­di­tions. Soon, their com­pa­ny — Healx — was born.

This Ju­ly, the Cam­bridge, UK-based com­pa­ny raised $10 mil­lion in a Se­ries A round of fund­ing. On Wednes­day, Healx un­veiled a fresh $56 mil­lion in­jec­tion — as it preps for a Phase IIa clin­i­cal tri­al ex­pect­ed to ini­ti­ate in the first quar­ter of 2020 — in pa­tients with Frag­ile X syn­drome, a con­di­tion that spawns de­vel­op­men­tal prob­lems and is con­sid­ered the lead­ing ge­net­ic cause of autism.

Nick Sireau

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The tri­al will eval­u­ate the safe­ty and ef­fi­ca­cy of a com­bi­na­tion ther­a­py, Guil­liams told End­points News, de­clin­ing to pro­vide fur­ther de­tail.

“If you look at com­bi­na­tions of two or three drugs, you have about 13 bil­lion pos­si­bil­i­ties per dis­ease — so how do you se­lect the top 10, the top 20? And we don’t go be­yond that,” Guil­liams said. Healx’s AI plat­form claims to short­en the dis­cov­ery-to-clin­ic time­line to as lit­tle as 24 months.

David Brown

Healx’s ap­proach does not lean on an ini­tial hy­poth­e­sis. “We let the al­go­rithm de­cide which dis­eases we’re go­ing to work on, which drugs are be­ing matched. And then we work out a mech­a­nism or hy­poth­e­sis af­ter­wards,” he said.

So far, Healx has launched 10 pre­clin­i­cal pro­grams across a pletho­ra of in­di­ca­tions — of which four (in­clud­ing the Frag­ile X pro­gram) have reaped re­sults so far, Guil­liams said, not­ing that each of these read­outs has been pos­i­tive. With this Se­ries B, the plan is to launch an­oth­er 40 pre­clin­i­cal pro­grams, he added.

If they are suc­cess­ful — with any of these shots on goal — the plan is to make sure pric­ing is not in the typ­i­cal or­phan drug price range which hov­ers around $240,000 per pa­tient per year, Guil­liams said.

Re­pur­pos­ing drugs on pur­pose (or by ac­ci­dent) has yield­ed some suc­cess — that the process in­volves large­ly de-risked com­pounds, low­er de­vel­op­men­tal costs, and briefer time­lines doesn’t hurt ei­ther.

Vi­a­gra is, of course, the most heav­i­ly cit­ed ex­am­ple. The drug, known chem­i­cal­ly as silde­nafil, was orig­i­nal­ly be­ing test­ed as a treat­ment for coro­nary hy­per­ten­sion — but a pesky side ef­fect felt by pa­tients in tri­als led to its even­tu­al ap­proval as an erec­tile dys­func­tion drug.

Then there’s the seda­tive thalido­mide — which gained no­to­ri­ety af­ter its link to se­vere skele­tal birth de­fects trig­gered its with­draw­al in 1957. How­ev­er, years lat­er it was deemed ef­fec­tive as a can­cer treat­ment, even breed­ing the de­vel­op­ment and ap­proval of even more suc­cess­ful de­riv­a­tives, such as Cel­gene’s block­buster Revlim­id.

Mean­while, Mer­ck’s Vioxx — which was un­cer­e­mo­ni­ous­ly tak­en off shelves af­ter its link to dou­bling pa­tients’ risk of heart at­tack and stroke emerged — could resur­face as a gener­ic treat­ment for a side ef­fect ex­pe­ri­enced by he­mo­phil­ia pa­tients. The gener­ic ver­sion is be­ing prepped for a piv­otal tri­al slat­ed to be­gin next year.

But akin to tra­di­tion­al drug de­vel­op­ment, drug re­pur­pos­ing has al­so seen its share of set­backs. Two ex­am­ples of late-stage fail­ures in­clude the bid to use the an­ti­his­t­a­mine, la­trepir­dine, as a treat­ment for Hunt­ing­ton’s dis­ease, as well as the pur­suit of re­pur­pos­ing the an­tibi­ot­ic, cef­tri­ax­one, as a med­i­cine for ALS.

Healx’s Se­ries B was led by Eu­ro­pean VC firm Atom­i­co and joined by Glob­al Brain and btov Part­ners. All pre­vi­ous in­vestors, in­clud­ing Balder­ton Cap­i­tal, Amadeus Cap­i­tal Part­ners and Jonathan Mil­ner, al­so par­tic­i­pat­ed in the round.

Healx did not ini­tial­ly plan to raise more mon­ey this year, but in­ter­est in their ap­proach bal­looned giv­en their progress, Guil­liams said. “I think that’s a re­al­ly good sign for the in­vest­ment land­scape in the UK and Eu­rope be­cause for Eu­rope it’s a pret­ty large B round…com­pared to the US.”

“And I’m won­der­ing if part of that is let’s make sure we in­vest be­fore Brex­it kicks in.”

A new era of treat­ment: How bio­mark­ers are chang­ing the way we think about can­cer

AJ Patel was recovering from a complicated brain surgery when his oncologist burst into the hospital room yelling, “I’ve got some really great news for you!”

For two years, Patel had been going from doctor to doctor trying to diagnose his wheezing, only to be dealt the devastating news that he had stage IV lung cancer and only six months to live. And then they found the brain tumors.

“What are you talking about?” Patel asked. He had never seen an oncologist so happy.

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Serhat Gumrukçu, Enochian BioSciences co-founder (Seraph Research Institute)

LA biotech founder ar­rest­ed, charged in mur­der-for-hire scheme be­hind 2018 death

A biotech founder has been arrested and charged for his role in a murder-for-hire scheme that resulted in the death of a man in Vermont back in 2018.

Serhat Gumrukçu, the co-founder of Enochian BioSciences, was arrested in Los Angeles, where the company is based, according to the Department of Justice. He was charged alongside Berk Eratay of Las Vegas, and a third person, Jerry Banks of Colorado, was previously arrested for kidnapping and allegedly murdering the victim, Gregory Davis.

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Adam Russell, ARPA-H's incoming acting deputy director

NI­H's new, in­de­pen­dent break­through drug ac­cel­er­a­tor ARPA-H gets its first em­ploy­ee

Despite the controversy of housing it in NIH, HHS Secretary Xavier Becerra on Wednesday afternoon formally announced the establishment of the Advanced Research Project Agency for Health (ARPA-H) as an independent entity within the NIH, as HHS had previously stipulated that “NIH may not subject ARPA-H to NIH policies.”

Becerra also announced the appointment of ARPA-H’s inaugural employee, Adam Russell, who will serve as acting deputy director.

ProFound Therapeutics founding team

Flag­ship's lat­est biotech could turn some of the thou­sands of new pro­teins it dis­cov­ered in­to ther­a­pies — and it has $75M to start

Flagship Pioneering, the incubator of Moderna and dozens of other biotechs, says it has landed upon tens of thousands of previously undiscovered human proteins. The VC shop wants to potentially turn them into therapeutics.

Like other drug developers that have turned proteins into therapeutics (think insulin for diabetes), Flagship’s latest creation, ProFound Therapeutics, wants to tap into this new trove of proteins as part of its mission to treat indications ranging from rare diseases to cancer to immunological diseases.

Richard Silverman, Akava Therapeutics founder and Northwestern professor

This time around, Lyri­ca's in­ven­tor is de­vel­op­ing his North­west­ern dis­cov­er­ies at his own biotech

Richard Silverman was left in the dark for the last five years of clinical development of the drug he discovered. The Northwestern University professor found out about the first approval of Lyrica, in the last few days of 2004, like most other people: in the newspaper.

What became one of Pfizer’s top-selling meds, at $5 billion in 2017 global sales before losing patent protection in 2019, started slipping out of his hands when Northwestern licensed it out to Parke-Davis, one of two biotechs that showed interest in developing the drug in the pre-email days, when the university’s two-person tech transfer team had to ship out letters to garner industry appetite.

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David Ricks, Eli Lilly CEO (David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Eli Lil­ly set to in­vest $2.1B in home state man­u­fac­tur­ing boost

Eli Lilly is looking to expand its footprint in its home Hoosier State by making a major investment in manufacturing.

The pharma is investing $2.1 billion in two new manufacturing sites at Indiana’s LEAP Lebanon Innovation and Research District in Boone County, northwest of Lilly’s headquarters in Indianapolis.

The two new facilities will expand Lilly’s manufacturing network for active ingredients and new therapeutic modalities, including genetic medicines, according to a press release.

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Up­dat­ed: US sees spike in Paxlovid us­age as Mer­ck­'s mol­nupi­ravir and As­traZeneca's Evusheld are slow­er off the shelf

New data from HHS show that more than 162,000 courses of Pfizer’s Covid-19 antiviral Paxlovid were administered across the US over the past week, continuing a streak of increased usage of the pill, and signaling not only rising case numbers but more awareness of how to access it.

In comparison to this week, about 670,000 courses of the Pfizer pill have been administered across the first five months since Paxlovid has been on the US market, averaging about 33,000 courses administered per week in that time.

Pfiz­er and CD­MOs ramp up Paxlovid man­u­fac­tur­ing with Kala­ma­zoo plant ex­pan­sion lead­ing the way

As the Covid-19 pandemic continues to evolve, pharma companies and manufacturers are exploring how to step up production on antivirals.

Pfizer is planning to expand its Kalamazoo-area facility to increase manufacturing capabilities for the oral Covid-19 antiviral Paxlovid, according to a report from Michigan-based news site MLive. The expansion of the facility, which serves as Pfizer’s largest manufacturing location, is expected to create hundreds of “high-skilled” STEM jobs, MLive reported. No details about the project’s cost and timeline have been released, but according to MLive, Pfizer will announce the details of the expansion at some point in early June.

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FDA spells out the rules and re­stric­tions for states seek­ing to im­port drugs from Cana­da

The FDA is offering more of an explanation of the guardrails around its program that may soon allow states to import prescription drugs in some select circumstances from Canada, but only if such imports will result in significant cost reductions for consumers.

While the agency has yet to sign off on any of the 5 state plans in the works so far, and PhRMA’s suit to block the Trump-era rule allowing such imports is stalled, the new Q&A guidance spells out the various restrictions that states will have to abide by, potentially signaling that a state approval is coming.