Spun out of George Church's lab, this biotech up­start is map­ping the AAV uni­verse for No­var­tis, Sarep­ta to gaze

In a few days, through a se­ries of video con­fer­ences, gene ther­a­py re­searchers around the world will be pre­sent­ing their lat­est find­ings at the vir­tu­al an­nu­al meet­ing of the Amer­i­can So­ci­ety of Gene & Cell Ther­a­py. Al­most every dis­cus­sion will fea­ture a top­ic that has been cen­tral to the ex­is­tence of the field but con­tin­ues to per­plex ex­perts as they seek to re­fine the modal­i­ty: the de­liv­ery of a gene to the tis­sue where it’s need­ed to fix dis­ease.

For the first time, a biotech up­start will be pub­licly out­lin­ing their take on the prob­lem — with an ar­ti­fi­cial in­tel­li­gence fla­vor that No­var­tis and Sarep­ta are gob­bling up.

Sea­soned at­ten­dees of AS­GCT would rec­og­nize the team be­hind Dyno Ther­a­peu­tics. Since Er­ic Kel­sic be­gan build­ing the plat­form in 2015 as a post­doc at George Church’s il­lus­tri­ous lab at Wyss In­sti­tute, he’s been mak­ing the rounds at sci­en­tif­ic meet­ings. At Har­vard, his group had demon­strat­ed how — by do­ing high through­put screen­ing on all cap­sid vari­ants of one par­tic­u­lar AAV serotype, mod­el­ing the space with ma­chine learn­ing, and fi­nal­ly build­ing a pro­file of each cap­sid that can be ranked by dif­fer­ent at­trib­ut­es — they could point to syn­thet­ic AAV cap­sid can­di­dates that are su­pe­ri­or to the hand­ful of nat­ur­al vari­ants cur­rent­ly in use.

Alan Crane

“This was by far the best ap­pli­ca­tion that I’d ever seen of AI in bi­ol­o­gy,” Alan Crane, an en­tre­pre­neur part­ner at Po­laris and Dyno’s ex­ec­u­tive chair­man, told End­points News. “It turns out po­ten­tial part­ners were see­ing it the same way, be­cause when Er­ic came to me back in mid-2018, he al­ready had this list of lit­er­al­ly dozens of com­pa­nies that have proac­tive­ly ap­proached him.”

Out of that pool Dyno had picked No­var­tis for a col­lab­o­ra­tion on eye dis­or­ders and Sarep­ta to team up on mus­cle dis­eases. Up­front pay­ments, sup­port, op­tion fees and mile­stones from these two deals could add up to $2 bil­lion, in­clud­ing $40 mil­lion from the re­search phase of the Sarep­ta deal.

Louise Rodi­no-Kla­pac

“We al­ways con­stant­ly try to make sure that we are ahead of the curve in terms of our tech­nol­o­gy and look­ing at next-gen­er­a­tion treat­ments,” Louise Rodi­no-Kla­pac, Sarep­ta’s head of gene ther­a­py, said. “So al­though we’re very hap­py with our cur­rent ap­proach and our cur­rent vec­tor, we’re think­ing about the fu­ture po­ten­tial tech­nolo­gies for oth­er mus­cu­lar dy­s­tro­phies.”

Cap­sids — the pro­tein shells that en­close ge­net­ic ma­te­r­i­al of a virus — is one of three core com­po­nents need­ed to form a gene ther­a­py, she ex­plained, along­side the trans­gene that’s miss­ing or de­fec­tive in a pa­tient, and a pro­mot­er that turns the gene on in the cell. And small tweaks to the cap­sid can trans­late to pro­found changes in the fi­nal prod­uct’s im­muno­genic­i­ty, man­u­fac­tura­bil­i­ty, ef­fi­cien­cy of de­liv­ery, speci­fici­ty to tar­get cells and pack­age size.

Er­ic Kel­sic

All of these met­rics are tak­en in­to con­sid­er­a­tion on Dyno’s Cap­sidMap plat­form, which takes “the most com­pre­hen­sive ap­proach to map­ping out the AAV uni­verse,” fill­ing the gaps in each galaxy and telling stars from pure void, Kel­sic said.

“We don’t want to im­prove one prop­er­ty but have oth­er things get worse,” a chal­lenge that oth­ers who have at­tempt­ed to solve the prob­lem have faced, he added.

With a new tech­nol­o­gy that promis­es to op­ti­mize vi­ral vec­tors for in­di­vid­ual ap­pli­ca­tions like that, Crane pre­dict­ed the com­pa­ny — which Po­laris seed­ed with a mod­est $9 mil­lion — might nev­er need ad­di­tion­al ven­ture funds.

While Dyno re­tains the op­tion to cre­ate its own ther­a­pies, ex­pect part­ner­ships (and there are more com­ing) to re­main at the cen­ter for a while.

“What I’ve ob­served in the in­dus­try — not on­ly in gene ther­a­py but in all ar­eas — is as com­pa­nies start to move in­to pipelines, they usu­al­ly have to leave the plat­form be­hind,” Crane said.

Much work is to be done. Dyno cur­rent­ly has ca­pac­i­ty to screen hun­dreds of thou­sands to mil­lions of cap­sids and test them both in vit­ro and in vi­vo, but the plan is to scale up the in­fra­struc­ture even fur­ther — both on the ex­per­i­men­tal and the com­pu­ta­tion­al fronts. The head­count is dou­bling from rough­ly 20 while all the ma­chine learn­ing gets moved on­to the cloud.

A can­di­date won’t emerge any time soon, and even when it does ma­te­ri­al­ize it would have to go through rig­or­ous safe­ty test­ing at the part­ners’ own R&D op­er­a­tions — a process that could take an­oth­er one or two years. Still, Kel­sic sees it as the quick­est way to bring their work to pa­tients even while they fig­ure new things out.

“Es­pe­cial­ly when we’re think­ing about tech­nol­o­gy, some­thing George and I talked a lot about when we start­ed this project, it still feels re­al­ly ear­ly days for gene ther­a­py,” he said. “There’s so much po­ten­tial.”

Regeneron CEO Leonard Schleifer speaks at a meeting with President Donald Trump, members of the Coronavirus Task Force, and pharmaceutical executives in the Cabinet Room of the White House (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

OWS shifts spot­light to drugs to fight Covid-19, hand­ing Re­gen­eron $450M to be­gin large scale man­u­fac­tur­ing in the US

The US government is on a spending spree. And after committing billions to vaccines defense operations are now doling out more of the big bucks through Operation Warp Speed to back a rapid flip of a drug into the market to stop Covid-19 from ravaging patients — possibly inside of 2 months.

The beneficiary this morning is Regeneron, the big biotech engaged in a frenzied race to develop an antibody cocktail called REGN-COV2 that just started a late-stage program to prove its worth in fighting the virus. BARDA and the Department of Defense are awarding Regeneron a $450 million contract to cover bulk delivery of the cocktail starting as early as late summer, with money added for fill/finish and storage activities.

Endpoints News

Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription

Unlock this story instantly and join 84,800+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free.

Ed Engleman (Stanford Blood Center)

Stan­ford star on­col­o­gy sci­en­tist Ed En­gle­man helped cre­ate the im­munother­a­py field. Now he wants to shake up neu­rode­gen­er­a­tion R&D

Over the last generation of drug R&D, Ed Engleman has been a standout scientist.

The Stanford professor co-founded Dendreon and provided the scientific insights needed to develop Provenge into a pioneering — though not particularly marketable — immunotherapy. He’s spurred a slate of startups, assisted by his well-connected perch as a co-founder of Vivo Capital, and took the dendritic cell story into its next chapter at a startup called Bolt.

Endpoints News

Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription

Unlock this story instantly and join 84,800+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free.

Atul Deshpande, Harbour BioMed chief strategy officer & head, US operations (Harbour BioMedO

An­oth­er biotech IPO set-up? Multi­na­tion­al biotech leaps from round to round, scoop­ing up cash at a blis­ter­ing pace

A short four months after announcing a $75 million haul in Series B+ fundraising, the multinational biotech Harbour BioMed pulled in another round of investments and eclipsed the nine-digit mark in the process.

Harbour completed its Series C financing, the company announced Thursday morning, raising $102.8 million and bringing its total investment sum to over $300 million since its founding in late 2016. The biotech plans to use the money to transition early-stage candidates from the discovery phase, fund candidates already in the clinic, and prep late-stage candidates for commercialization.

Endpoints News

Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription

Unlock this story instantly and join 84,800+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free.

Covid-19 roundup: Af­ter promis­ing US its sum­mer sup­ply, Gilead in talks with EU over remde­sivir ac­cess; First in­haled remde­sivir study un­der­way

It wasn’t lost on European journalists or European doctors that the “amazing deal” the Trump Administration said it signed with Gilead to buy up remdesivir meant that they would have severely limited access to one of only two drugs proven to treat Covid-19. “This is the first major approved drug, and where is the mechanism for access?” Andrew Hill, a research fellow at Liverpool University, told The Guardian. “Once again we’re at the back of the queue.”

Endpoints News

Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription

Unlock this story instantly and join 84,800+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free.

UP­DAT­ED: Bio­gen shares spike as ex­ecs com­plete a de­layed pitch for their con­tro­ver­sial Alzheimer's drug — the next move be­longs to the FDA

Biogen is stepping out onto the high wire today, reporting that the team working on the controversial Alzheimer’s drug aducanumab has now completed their submission to the FDA. And they want the agency to bless it with a priority review that would cut the agency’s decision-making time to a mere 6 months.

The news drove a 10% spike in Biogen’s stock $BIIB ahead of the bell.

Part of that spike can be attributed to a relief rally. Biogen execs rattled backers and a host of analysts earlier in the year when they unexpectedly delayed their filing to the third quarter. That delay provoked all manner of speculation after CEO Michel Vounatsos and R&D chief Al Sandrock failed to persuade influential observers that the pandemic and other factors had slowed the timeline for filing. Actually making the pitch at least satisfies skeptics that the FDA was not likely pushing back as Biogen was pushing in. From the start, Biogen execs claimed that they were doing everything in cooperation with the FDA, saying that regulators had signaled their interest in reviewing the submission.

Endpoints News

Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription

Unlock this story instantly and join 84,800+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free.

Noubar Afeyan, Flagship CEO and Tessera chairman (Victor Boyko/Getty Images)

Flag­ship ex­ecs take a les­son from na­ture to mas­ter ‘gene writ­ing,’ launch­ing a star-stud­ded biotech with big am­bi­tions to cure dis­ease

Flagship Pioneering has opened up its deep pockets to fund a biotech upstart out to revolutionize the whole gene therapy/gene editing field — before gene editing has even made it to the market. And they’ve surrounded themselves with some marquee scientists and execs who have crowded around to help shepherd the technology ahead.

The lead player here is Flagship general partner Geoff von Maltzahn, an MIT-trained synthetic biologist who set out in 2018 to do CRISPR — a widely used gene editing tool — and other rival technologies one or two better. Von Maltzahn has been working with Sana co-founder Jake Rubens, another synthetic biology player out of MIT who he describes as his “superstar,” who’s taken the CSO role.

Endpoints News

Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription

Unlock this story instantly and join 84,800+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free.

Adrian Gottschalk, Foghorn CEO

Mer­ck dan­gles up to $425 mil­lion to team with Flag­ship’s Foghorn Ther­a­peu­tics on drug­ging the shape of DNA

Two years after it first emerged from stealth mode, Flagship’s Foghorn Therapeutics has nabbed its first Big Pharma partner as Merck signs on to the biotech’s vision of drugging the very shape of DNA.

The deal, worth up to $425 million but with the upfront cash undisclosed, comes as Foghorn nears a pivot to a clinical stage biotech. The Cambridge-based company has added nearly 60 staffers from the 25 it had when it first emerged out of Flagship and, CEO Adrian Gottschalk said, they have finally refined the screening technology at the heart of the company, with plans to file their first IND towards the end of the year.

John Reed, Sanofi R&D chief (Endpoints News)

John Reed brings NK cells in­to Sanofi's CD38 ri­val­ry with J&J — and of­fers thumbs up for Kiadis' new fo­cus

Sanofi doesn’t just want to be a challenger to J&J’s dominant Darzalex multiple myeloma franchise. It’s looking to pioneer a new approach by pairing its own — newly approved — anti-CD38 drug with an NK cell therapy it’s just picked up.

The French pharma giant has teed up $19.7 million (€17.5 million) upfront and close to a billion dollars (€857.5 million) in milestones for a license to Kiadis Pharma’s preclinical K-NK004 program, which consists of NK cells that have been genetically engineered not to express CD38.

Endpoints News

Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription

Unlock this story instantly and join 84,800+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free.

Daniel O'Day, Gilead CEO (Kevin Dietsch/UPI/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

A new study points to $6.5B in pub­lic sup­port build­ing the sci­en­tif­ic foun­da­tion of Gilead­'s remde­sivir. Should that be re­flect­ed in the price?

By drug R&D standards, Gilead’s move to repurpose remdesivir for Covid-19 and grab an emergency use authorization was a remarkably easy, low-cost layup that required modest efficacy and a clean safety profile from just a small group of patients.

The drug OK also arrived after Gilead had paid much of the freight on getting it positioned to move fast.

In a study by Fred Ledley, director of the Center for Integration of Science and Industry at Bentley University in Waltham, MA, researchers concluded that the NIH had invested only $46.5 million in the research devoted to the drug ahead of the pandemic, a small sum compared to the more than $1 billion Gilead expected to spend getting it out this year, all on top of what it had already cost in R&D expenses.

Endpoints Premium

Premium subscription required

Unlock this article along with other benefits by subscribing to one of our paid plans.