Mark Kotter, University of Cambridge

Sure, Bit Bio got some sig­nif­i­cant cash for its cell cod­ing work. But it’s the in­sid­ers who are back­ing them that will gar­ner the at­ten­tion

Mark Kotter’s synthetic biology team at Bit Bio has already won lots of local recognition in the UK for its tech for precision reprogramming of stem cells at an industrial scale. Now they have a jolt of cash from some marquee US investors to fuel the work and drive some added global panache for the biotech’s profile.

The money — $41.5 million — isn’t likely to stir much attention these days as billions in cash continue to course through the industry. These investor names, though, as well as their interest in cell therapy 2.0, should create a tingle of excitement.

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Regeneron CEO Leonard Schleifer speaks at a meeting with President Donald Trump, members of the Coronavirus Task Force, and pharmaceutical executives in the Cabinet Room of the White House (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

OWS shifts spot­light to drugs to fight Covid-19, hand­ing Re­gen­eron $450M to be­gin large scale man­u­fac­tur­ing in the US

The US government is on a spending spree. And after committing billions to vaccines defense operations are now doling out more of the big bucks through Operation Warp Speed to back a rapid flip of a drug into the market to stop Covid-19 from ravaging patients — possibly inside of 2 months.

The beneficiary this morning is Regeneron, the big biotech engaged in a frenzied race to develop an antibody cocktail called REGN-COV2 that just started a late-stage program to prove its worth in fighting the virus. BARDA and the Department of Defense are awarding Regeneron a $450 million contract to cover bulk delivery of the cocktail starting as early as late summer, with money added for fill/finish and storage activities.

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Covid-19 roundup: EU backs Os­i­vax's pur­suit of a uni­ver­sal vac­cine to fight Covid-19

The race to find a vaccine for the novel coronavirus continues to heat up, as the European Commission’s pilot R&D arm taps French biotech Osivax to head up its unique approach to the research.

Aiming to develop a universal jab for the flu and Covid-19, Osivax secured around $20 million in “blended financing” from the European Innovation Council. About $3 million comes from a Covid-19 “accelerator grant” and will go toward completing Osivax’s signature flu vaccine, dubbed OVX836 and currently in Phase IIa. The rest will be included as part of Osivax’s Series B funding, which aims to launch the Phase IIb portion of the study.

GSK sets the stage for a toe-to-toe mar­ket show­down with Gilead­'s HIV cham­pi­on Tru­va­da

ViiV Healthcare and majority owner GlaxoSmithKline have cleared another important hurdle on a long-running quest to challenge Gilead’s dominance in preventative HIV treatments.

The final analysis of a new study shows the GSK subsidiary’s long-lasting injection, cabotegravir, proved 66% more effective in HIV prevention than Gilead’s breakthrough Truvada pill. And they now intend to carve away some of the blockbuster revenue that Gilead has enjoyed for years.

Adrian Gottschalk, Foghorn CEO

Mer­ck dan­gles up to $425 mil­lion to team with Flag­ship’s Foghorn Ther­a­peu­tics on drug­ging the shape of DNA

Two years after it first emerged from stealth mode, Flagship’s Foghorn Therapeutics has nabbed its first Big Pharma partner as Merck signs on to the biotech’s vision of drugging the very shape of DNA.

The deal, worth up to $425 million but with the upfront cash undisclosed, comes as Foghorn nears a pivot to a clinical stage biotech. The Cambridge-based company has added nearly 60 staffers from the 25 it had when it first emerged out of Flagship and, CEO Adrian Gottschalk said, they have finally refined the screening technology at the heart of the company, with plans to file their first IND towards the end of the year.

John Reed, Sanofi R&D chief (Endpoints News)

John Reed brings NK cells in­to Sanofi's CD38 ri­val­ry with J&J — and of­fers thumbs up for Kiadis' new fo­cus

Sanofi doesn’t just want to be a challenger to J&J’s dominant Darzalex multiple myeloma franchise. It’s looking to pioneer a new approach by pairing its own — newly approved — anti-CD38 drug with an NK cell therapy it’s just picked up.

The French pharma giant has teed up $19.7 million (€17.5 million) upfront and close to a billion dollars (€857.5 million) in milestones for a license to Kiadis Pharma’s preclinical K-NK004 program, which consists of NK cells that have been genetically engineered not to express CD38.

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Trump and Navar­ro press again for hy­drox­y­chloro­quine. Can the FDA stay in­de­pen­dent?

Tuesday morning, economist and Trump advisor Peter Navarro walked onto the White House driveway and promptly brought a political cloud back onto the FDA.

Speaking to a White House pool reporter, Navarro said that four Detroit doctors were, based on a single disputed study, filing for the FDA to again issue an emergency authorization for hydroxychloroquine, the anti-malarial pill that President Trump hyped for months as a Covid-19 treatment over the objections of his own scientists. Then, while avoiding directly calling for the FDA to OK the drug, blasted the agency. He said its decision to pull an earlier authorization “was based on bad science” and “had a tremendously negative effect” on doctors and patients.

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David Hallal

AlloVir tests how much an an­tivi­ral biotech can reap in a pan­dem­ic stock mar­ket

The pandemic stock market has proven fruitful for virtually any type of biotech. Now a 7-year-old cell therapy startup will see how much it can yield for a company that specializes in fighting viruses.

AlloVir, a company that until 2019 largely lived off grant money, has filed for a $100 million IPO to back its line of off-the-shelf, virus-fighting T cells. Although in normal circumstances, $100 million could be a solid return for a biotech that got its first major round of funding only last year, we’ll have to wait to see how much the company ultimately earns. As Covid-19 has sent investor money scurrying to almost anyone in drug development, every single biotech to go public this year has prized above their midpoint or upsized their offering, according to Renaissance Capital, sometimes dramatically so.

Noubar Afeyan, Flagship CEO and Tessera chairman (Victor Boyko/Getty Images)

Flag­ship ex­ecs take a les­son from na­ture to mas­ter ‘gene writ­ing,’ launch­ing a star-stud­ded biotech with big am­bi­tions to cure dis­ease

Flagship Pioneering has opened up its deep pockets to fund a biotech upstart out to revolutionize the whole gene therapy/gene editing field — before gene editing has even made it to the market. And they’ve surrounded themselves with some marquee scientists and execs who have crowded around to help shepherd the technology ahead.

The lead player here is Flagship general partner Geoff von Maltzahn, an MIT-trained synthetic biologist who set out in 2018 to do CRISPR — a widely used gene editing tool — and other rival technologies one or two better. Von Maltzahn has been working with Sana co-founder Jake Rubens, another synthetic biology player out of MIT who he describes as his “superstar,” who’s taken the CSO role.

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In­vestors give ail­ing Unum a lease on life and a whole new suite of ex­per­i­men­tal can­cer drugs

Investors, it seems, are willing to give Unum Therapeutics one last shot — or at least one last shot to a company of that name.

The ailing cancer biotech, beset by a series of clinical holds and multiple failed lead programs, announced today that they’ve acquired Kiq LLC and that investors are putting in $104 million to advance Kiq’s pipeline of kinase inhibitors. Unum shareholders will now own only 16.2% of the company and CEO Chuck Wilson indicated that the cell therapies the biotech has worked on since its founding may be on their way out, saying Unum will “explore strategic options” for those products.