The top win­ners and losers on AS­CO ab­stract night: Loxo, Blue­print, Jounce, Mer­ck KGaA and more

Let the joust­ing be­gin.

The big ab­stract drop ahead of AS­CO — the an­nu­al Olympics of can­cer R&D — pro­vid­ed some ear­ly, quick snap­shots that helped dri­ve stocks up or down, or sim­ply pro­vid­ed a chance to tout some po­ten­tial in a hot­ly con­test­ed field.

As more and more bio­phar­ma mon­ey has been in­vest­ed in the on­col­o­gy field in re­cent years, AS­CO has been at­tract­ing a big­ger range of en­trants, and ab­stract night will help de­ter­mine who comes out on top dur­ing the melee ahead. I’ve picked out a few of the most no­tice­able ab­stracts, which you can see be­low.

Loxo takes an­oth­er round in its bruis­ing, toe-to-toe fight with Blue­print

Josh Bilenker

Loxo On­col­o­gy $LOXO was the big win­ner Wednes­day night as in­vestors be­gan to pick through a pile of AS­CO ab­stracts to see what gems could be culled from the num­bers.

The biotech’s stock soared 18% overnight as in­vestors spot­light­ed a 69% over­all re­sponse rate among 32 evalu­able RET-fu­sion pos­i­tive pa­tients tak­ing LOXO-292. Loxo’s claim to fame is that it de­vel­ops can­cer drugs that tar­get small, ge­net­i­cal­ly de­fined pa­tient groups with an ag­nos­tic ap­proach to tu­mor types. Reg­u­la­tors at the FDA have been en­thu­si­as­tic about this emerg­ing field, which bodes well for Loxo. And they backed that en­thu­si­asm up with da­ta demon­strat­ing a 65% re­sponse rate in NSCLC and 83% for pap­il­lary thy­roid can­cer. 84% (27/32) of the pa­tients had ra­di­ograph­ic tu­mor re­duc­tion rang­ing from 19% to 67%.

That’s good, but it may well get bet­ter. Loxo CEO Josh Bilenker has flagged that since the Jan­u­ary cut­off date for the ab­stract the da­ta are even bet­ter now, which we’ll see at AS­CO. Loxo helped stoke the en­thu­si­asm with a note high­light­ing that LOXO-292 has been se­lect­ed for best of show at AS­CO, which will keep the com­pa­ny in the spot­light.

Can­cer R&D, though, is the ul­ti­mate blood sport in biotech. And when some­thing goes up, it’s of­ten at the ex­pense of a ri­val. In this case, that’s Blue­print Med­i­cines — again — which has al­ready felt the sting of a neg­a­tive com­par­i­son with Loxo.

Blue­print Med­i­cines $BPMC has been ad­vanc­ing BLU-667, which has been at­tract­ing warm re­views by an­a­lysts — un­less they start com­par­ing it to the ri­val. That side-by-side com­par­i­son knocked their stock back at AACR, and it did it again last night as the num­bers once again fa­vored Loxo. Shares are down about 8% in pre-mar­ket trad­ing Thurs­day.

No­var­tis vs Gilead/Kite: Is Kym­ri­ah bet­ter and safer than Yescar­ta?

Few ri­val­ries have been as in­tense as the show­down be­tween these two pi­o­neers in the CAR-T field. No­var­tis’ Kym­ri­ah $NVS still has to over­come a nag­ging is­sue with one-time man­u­fac­tur­ing is­sues, but Gilead’s Yescar­ta $GILD is now be­ing com­pared with its ri­val, and at first blush may have some ex­plain­ing to do. 

A group in Bei­jing ran a small com­par­i­son study of the two types of CAR-Ts — which use the 4-1BB and CD28 co-stim­u­la­to­ry sig­nal­ing do­mains — for CD19-pos­i­tive B-cell acute lym­phoblas­tic leukemia and found that the Kym­ri­ah/4-1BB ap­proach ap­pears to have a dis­tinct set of ad­van­tages. 

In that 4-1BB arm there was a 100% over­all ob­jec­tive re­sponse rate, com­pared to 89% in the CD28 arm. In ad­di­tion, and more im­por­tant­ly, all 5 of the pa­tients suf­fer­ing from se­ri­ous Grade 3 or 4 cy­tokine re­lease syn­drome were in the CD28/Yescar­ta group. This ar­gu­ment has a long way to run, and Gilead won’t con­cede an inch of the race. But the com­par­isons have just be­gun.

On Mon­day, Gilead con­tact­ed us to of­fer this state­ment:

It is im­por­tant to note that Yescar­ta was not eval­u­at­ed in this study. The ab­stract dis­cuss­es da­ta from a study eval­u­at­ing oth­er CAR T prod­ucts us­ing 4-1BB and CD28 co-stim­u­la­to­ry sig­nal­ing do­mains, re­spec­tive­ly. Im­por­tant­ly, Yescar­ta is en­gi­neered us­ing Kite’s man­u­fac­tur­ing process. The CD28 CAR T eval­u­at­ed in this tri­al was not man­u­fac­tured by Kite and there have been no head-to-head stud­ies of Yescar­ta com­pared to ti­s­agen­le­cleu­cel.

Ever­core ISI an­a­lyst Umer Raf­fat this morn­ing called the re­sults of this study provoca­tive, but wants to see the de­tails. So do I.

Jounce shares plunge on the lat­est da­ta cut for JTX-2011

Eliz­a­beth Tre­hu

The biggest los­er overnight was Jounce Ther­a­peu­tics $JNCE, which took a nasty hit af­ter post­ing their up­date on their lead ther­a­py — JTX-2011. As a monother­a­py, 1 out of 7 pa­tients with gas­tric can­cer re­spond­ed, com­pared to 2 out of 19 who got the com­bo with Op­di­vo — an 11% re­sponse rate. The rate wasn’t much bet­ter in triple-neg­a­tive breast can­cer. 

In a re­lease, re­searchers hit the theme that these were heav­i­ly pre­treat­ed pa­tients, but on­look­ers were in a can­tan­ker­ous mood and didn’t like the un­der­whelm­ing num­bers. Shares plunged 26% and Wells Far­go down­grad­ed the stock.

Cel­gene struck a ma­jor deal to col­lab­o­rate with Jounce on this drug, and that wasn’t ig­nored this morn­ing.

“The pre­lim­i­nary da­ta from pa­tients across mul­ti­ple sol­id tu­mor types en­rolled in the ICON­IC tri­al show that JTX-2011 is well-tol­er­at­ed alone and in com­bi­na­tion with nivolum­ab and has demon­strat­ed ev­i­dence of bi­o­log­ic ac­tiv­i­ty and tu­mor re­duc­tions in heav­i­ly pre-treat­ed pa­tients who have failed all avail­able ther­a­pies. In ad­di­tion, a po­ten­tial sur­ro­gate bio­mark­er of re­sponse has been iden­ti­fied that may help to guide JTX-2011 de­vel­op­ment,” said Eliz­a­beth Tre­hu, chief med­ical of­fi­cer of Jounce Ther­a­peu­tics.

Nek­tar sees a big ero­sion in re­sponse rates for close­ly-watched I/O star NK­TR-214

Nek­tar $NK­TR scored one of the biggest deals in bio­phar­ma so far this year when Bris­tol-My­ers came in with a $3.6 bil­lion deal to part­ner on NK­TR-214. That part­ner­ship was an­nounced in the wake of the first glimpse of how ef­fec­tive a pair­ing of their drug could be with Op­di­vo, with 63% of a small group of ad­vanced melanoma pa­tients re­spond­ing to first-line ther­a­py. But in Nek­tar’s up­date this week re­searchers note that the re­sponse rate in the bas­ket study showed a re­duced melanoma im­pact, with a 52% re­sponse rate.

Re­nal cell car­ci­no­ma al­so dropped, falling to 54%, down from 71% re­port­ed in the com­pa­ny’s Q4 call in ear­ly March.

That’s by no means the kiss of death. Re­sponse rates tend to de­cline over time. But an­a­lysts will be watch­ing these num­bers close­ly to see just how far they drop for a drug that is now front and cen­ter in the late-stage on­col­o­gy pipeline. The stock is down 3% in pre-mar­ket trad­ing, with the ju­ry still out on this promis­ing ther­a­py.

Mer­ck KGaA plans to shine a light on its can­cer pipeline at AS­CO — with Pfiz­er jump­ing in

Mer­ck KGaA will be back at AS­CO look­ing to earn some re­spect for its can­cer drug pipeline. So far the bulk of the at­ten­tion has gone to Baven­cio, its PD-L1 check­point in­hibitor part­nered with Pfiz­er, which is fight­ing an up­hill bat­tle to gain mar­ket share against the lead­ers in the field. But the Ger­man Mer­ck has a pipeline in on­col­o­gy, and they will do their best to high­light their chances on a range of ther­a­pies in Chica­go.

Its c-Met re­cep­tor ty­ro­sine ki­nase in­hibitor tepo­tinib has earned some ku­dos from Bern­stein. And re­searchers post­ed da­ta on 15 pa­tients with ad­vanced non-small cell lung can­cer har­bor­ing MET ex­on 14 skip­ping mu­ta­tions, with 60% demon­strat­ing a con­firmed par­tial re­sponse. An­a­lysts be­lieve this drug could hit $650 mil­lion in sales by 2030 — not a block­buster but a sol­id suc­cess, which the com­pa­ny bad­ly needs af­ter a long drought in clin­i­cal de­vel­op­ment suc­cess­es.

On the com­bo front, where all the PD-1/PD-L1 play­ers are fo­cus­ing on in a va­ri­ety of ways, Mer­ck KGaA tout­ed their M7824, a TGF-ß trap/an­ti-PD-L1 bi-func­tion­al im­munother­a­py fu­sion pro­tein. High PD-L1 ex­press­ing pa­tients ex­hib­it­ed an ORR of 71.4%.

The next big step on Baven­cio lies in com­bo ther­a­pies, and there Mer­ck KGaA says it gained some ear­ly-stage ev­i­dence to back up a com­bi­na­tion of the check­point with lor­la­tinib in non-small cell lung can­cer — a key com­pet­i­tive front for these play­ers. And their com­bo came out way ahead in the JAVELIN Lung 101 study, which com­pared their check­point with Xalko­ri (crizo­tinib) and the lor­la­tinib match-up. Lor­la­tinib — a drug Pfiz­er has high hopes for — came out way ahead. From the ab­stract:

The con­firmed ob­jec­tive re­sponse rate with A+C in ALK− pts was 16.7% (95% CI, 2.1-48.4; par­tial re­sponse [PR] in 2 pts), and with A+L in ALK+ pts was 46.4% (95% CI, 27.5-66.1; PR in 12 pts; com­plete re­sponse in 1 pt).


Im­age: Poster ses­sion at AS­CO 2017. AS­CO

Secretary of health and human services Alex Azar speaking in the Rose Garden at the White House (Photo: AFP)

Trump’s HHS claims ab­solute au­thor­i­ty over the FDA, clear­ing path to a vac­cine EUA

The top career staff at the FDA has vowed not to let politics overrule science when looking at vaccine data this fall. But Alex Azar, who happens to be their boss’s boss, apparently won’t even give them a chance to stand in the way.

In a new memorandum issued Tuesday last week, the HHS chief stripped the FDA and other health agencies under his purview of their rule making ability, asserting all such power “is reserved to the Secretary.” Sheila Kaplan of the New York Times first obtained and reported the details of the September 15 bulletin.

#ES­MO20: Push­ing in­to front­line, Mer­ck and Bris­tol My­ers duke it out with new slate of GI can­cer da­ta

Having worked in parallel for years to move their respective PD-1 inhibitors up to the first-line treatment of gastrointestinal cancers, Merck and Bristol Myers Squibb finally have the data at ESMO for a showdown.

Comparing KEYNOTE-590 and CheckMate-649, of course, comes with the usual caveats. But a side-by-side look at the overall survival numbers also offer some perspective on a new frontier for the reigning checkpoint rivals, both of whom are claiming to have achieved a first.

President Donald Trump (via AP Images)

Signs of an 'Oc­to­ber Vac­cine Sur­prise' alarm ca­reer sci­en­tists

President Donald Trump, who seems intent on announcing a COVID-19 vaccine before Election Day, could legally authorize a vaccine over the objections of experts, officials at the FDA and even vaccine manufacturers, who have pledged not to release any vaccine unless it’s proved safe and effective.

In podcasts, public forums, social media and medical journals, a growing number of prominent health leaders say they fear that Trump — who has repeatedly signaled his desire for the swift approval of a vaccine and his displeasure with perceived delays at the FDA — will take matters into his own hands, running roughshod over the usual regulatory process.

#ES­MO20: Bris­tol My­ers marks Op­di­vo's sec­ond ad­ju­vant win — eye­ing a stan­dard of care gap

Moving into earlier and earlier treatment lines, Bristol Myers Squibb is reporting that adjuvant treatment with Opdivo has doubled the time that esophageal or gastroesophageal junction cancer patients stay free of disease.

With the CheckMate-577 data at ESMO, CMO Samit Hirawat said, the company believes it can change the treatment paradigm.

While a quarter to 30% of patients typically achieve a complete response following chemoradiation therapy and surgery, the rest do not, said Ronan Kelly of Baylor University Medical Center. The recurrence rate is also high within the first year, Hirawat added.

Clay Siegall (Life Science Washington via YouTube)

#ES­MO20: Seat­tle Ge­net­ics eyes 4th ap­proval with new da­ta in a crowd­ed field

Does Seattle Genetics have another approval on its hands?

The last 12 months, not so great for the world, has been great for Seattle Genetics. The company landed two separate FDA approvals, signed a $4.5 billion deal with Merck and watched antibody-drug conjugates — the technology they spent years developing to broad industry skepticism — emerge suddenly as one of the most popular approaches in oncology. And on Monday at ESMO, the company and their partners at Genmab unveiled the data behind the ADC it hopes will provide its next major FDA approval.

Jonathan Rigby, Immune Regulation group CEO

Im­mune Reg­u­la­tion, tak­ing two clin­i­cal pro­grams to 're­set' the im­mune sys­tem, nets $53M+ Se­ries B

A little under two years after a company rebranding, Immune Regulation is taking an even bigger step toward advancing its goals.

Formerly known as Peptinnovate, the British biotech announced a $53.4 million Series B early Monday morning, helping to further advance two clinical programs in rheumatoid arthritis and asthma. Though those are the two initial indications the company is focusing on, CEO Jonathan Rigby told Endpoints News he hopes the candidates can be applied to a broad swath of autoimmune disorders.

Eli Lilly CSO Dan Skovronsky (file photo)

UP­DAT­ED: #ES­MO20: Eli Lil­ly shows off the da­ta for its Verzenio suc­cess. Was it worth $18 bil­lion?

The press release alone, devoid of any number except for the size of the trial, added nearly $20 billion to Eli Lilly’s market cap back in June. Now investors and oncologists will get to see if the data live up to the hype.

On Sunday at ESMO, Eli Lilly announced the full results for its Phase III MonarchE trial of Verzenio, showing that across over 5,000 women who had had HR+, HER2- breast cancer, the drug reduced the odds of recurrence by 25%. That meant 7.8% of the patients on the drug arm saw their cancers return within 2 years, compared with 11.3% on the placebo arm.

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Greg Friberg (File photo)

#ES­MO20: Am­gen team nails down sol­id ear­ly ev­i­dence of AMG 510’s po­ten­tial for NSCLC, un­lock­ing the door to a wave of KRAS pro­grams

The first time I sat down with Amgen’s Greg Friberg to talk about the pharma giant’s KRAS G12C program for sotorasib (AMG 510) at ASCO a little more than a year ago, there was high excitement about the first glimpse of efficacy from their Phase I study, with 5 of 10 evaluable non-small cell lung cancer patients demonstrating a response to the drug.

After decades of failure targeting KRAS, sotorasib offered the first positive look at a new approach that promised to open a door to a whole new approach by targeting a particular mutation to a big target that had remained “undruggable” for decades.

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#ES­MO20: Out to beat Tagris­so, J&J touts 100% ORR for EGFR bis­pe­cif­ic/TKI com­bo — fu­el­ing a quick leap to PhI­II

J&J’s one-two punch on EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer has turned up some promising — although decidedly early — results, fueling the idea that there’s yet room to one up on third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

Twenty out of 20 advanced NSCLC patients had a response after taking a combination of an in-house TKI dubbed lazertinib and amivantamab, a bispecific antibody targeting both EGFR and cMET engineered on partner Genmab’s platform, J&J reported at ESMO. All were treatment-naïve, and none has seen their cancer progress at a median follow-up of seven months.