Treve­na forges plan to take once-re­ject­ed opi­oid across fin­ish line, af­ter 'pro­duc­tive' FDA meet­ing

Tiny Treve­na may have a new lease on life for its con­tro­ver­sial opi­oid painkiller — re­ject­ed by the FDA last No­vem­ber cit­ing the dearth of drug safe­ty da­ta — fol­low­ing a scathing in­ter­nal staff cri­tique and lop­sided ex­pert pan­el re­view.

The com­pa­ny’s shares $TRVN swelled near­ly 120% on Mon­day af­ter Treve­na said the agency had agreed that the drug’s ex­ist­ing safe­ty data­base would suf­fice for a par­tic­u­lar dose of the drug — help­ing forge a path for­ward for the biotech to re­sub­mit its mar­ket­ing ap­pli­ca­tion.

The IV in­jec­tion, oliceri­dine, was de­vel­oped to help adult pa­tients man­age mod­er­ate to se­vere acute pain. It is de­signed to in­duce a sim­i­lar anal­gesic ef­fect as mor­phine, but work faster and re­duce the messy side ef­fects of se­da­tion, res­pi­ra­to­ry de­pres­sion and slow­ing gas­troin­testi­nal motil­i­ty. But mixed tri­al re­sults and gaps in safe­ty da­ta in­clud­ing QT in­ter­val da­ta — the time the heart mus­cle takes to recharge be­tween beats — prompt­ed the reg­u­la­tor to even­tu­al­ly re­ject the opi­oid in ear­ly No­vem­ber. At the time, the agency asked for a big­ger safe­ty data­base for the drug, as well as “cer­tain ad­di­tion­al non­clin­i­cal da­ta and val­i­da­tion re­ports”.

Car­rie Bour­dow

On Mon­day, Treve­na said its cur­rent safe­ty da­ta would sup­port la­bel­ing at a max­i­mum dai­ly dose of 27 mg, and that the FDA had agreed that the com­pa­ny con­duct a study (in­clud­ing place­bo- and pos­i­tive-con­trol arms) in healthy vol­un­teers to amass the re­quest­ed QT in­ter­val da­ta.

The Chester­brook, Penn­syl­va­nia-based drug de­vel­op­er in­tends to sub­mit a pro­to­col and analy­sis plan to the FDA short­ly and, up­on re­ceipt of reg­u­la­to­ry feed­back, ex­pects to ini­ti­ate the study in the first half of 2019. The com­pa­ny added it does not need any more ef­fi­ca­cy da­ta to re­sub­mit its mar­ket­ing ap­pli­ca­tion for the drug, but did not pro­vide any de­tails on when that re­sub­mis­sion could be ex­pect­ed.

CEO Car­rie Bour­dow said she was “en­cour­aged by the pro­duc­tive dis­cus­sion” with the FDA in a state­ment.

Max­ine Gowen

Back in 2016, un­der the be­hest of CEO Max­ine Gowen, Treve­na had sug­gest­ed an end-of-Phase II meet­ing with the FDA had cul­mi­nat­ed in a gen­er­al agree­ment about the Phase III de­sign for oliceri­dine, and that Gowen was “very pleased” with the dis­cus­sion. But it was on­ly last year that it was re­vealed that the FDA had in fact in­di­cat­ed oth­er­wise — the agency had dis­agreed with pro­posed dos­ing and the pri­ma­ry end­point in the late-stage pro­gram. This rev­e­la­tion prompt­ed at­tor­neys at Bern­stein Lieb­hard to ac­cuse Treve­na ex­ecs, par­tic­u­lar­ly for­mer CEO Max­ine Gowen, of mis­lead­ing in­vestors for rough­ly two years.

FDA pol­i­cy dic­tates it must not re­lease any in­for­ma­tion re­lat­ed to dis­cus­sions with drug spon­sors un­til a drug is up for re­view. Com­mis­sion­er Scott Got­tlieb had ini­tial­ly made promis­es to arm the agency to re­veal more in­for­ma­tion, for in­stance the reg­u­la­tor’s rea­son­ing be­hind is­sued CRLs, but that has not come to fruition.

Mean­while, the FDA’s ap­proval of an­oth­er opi­oid amidst a na­tion­al cri­sis of opi­oid abuse, mis­use and ad­dic­tion that kills about 130 Amer­i­cans each day will like­ly cause more fric­tion. Acel­Rx’s $ACRX ap­proval for its opi­oid Dsu­via last year sparked a flur­ry of in­tense crit­i­cism, even prompt­ing a mem­ber of the FDA’s own ex­pert pan­el to call out the agency’s at­ti­tude to­ward opi­oids as “will­ful blind­ness that bor­ders on the crim­i­nal.

Janet Woodcock (Greg Nash/Pool via AP Images)

'I re­al­ly don’t look back': Janet Wood­cock on her tran­si­tion away from drugs

Janet Woodcock may have one of the most historically long and drug-intense tenures in FDA history, but her new role is outside of all things pharma and the once-acting FDA commissioner isn’t looking back.

“No I really don’t look back,” Woodcock told Endpoints News via email on Monday morning. “Yes I will be transitioning. Longer discussion on infrastructure needed.”

Co­pay coupons gone wrong, again: Pfiz­er pays al­most $300K to set­tle com­plaints in four states

Pfizer has agreed to pay $290,000 to settle allegations of questionable copay coupon practices in Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, and Vermont from 2014 to 2018.

While the company has not admitted any wrongdoing as part of the settlement, Pfizer has agreed to issue restitution checks to about 5,000 consumers.

A Pfizer spokesperson said the company has “enhanced its co-pay coupons to alleviate the concerns raised by states and agreed to a $30,000 payment to each.”

Delaware court rules against Gilead and Astel­las in years-long patent case

A judge in Delaware has ruled against Astellas Pharma and Gilead in a long-running patent case over Pfizer-onwed Hospira’s generic version of Lexiscan.

The case kicked off in 2018, after Hospira submitted an Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) for approval to market a generic version of Gilead’s Lexiscan. The drug is used in myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), a type of nuclear stress test.

Taye Diggs (courtesy Idorsia)

Idor­sia inks an­oth­er celebri­ty en­dors­er deal with ac­tor and dad Taye Dig­gs as Qu­viviq in­som­nia am­bas­sador

Idorsia’s latest Quviviq insomnia campaign details the relatable dad story of a well-known celebrity — actor and Broadway star Taye Diggs.

Diggs stopped sleeping well after the birth of his son, now more than 10 years ago. Switching mom-and-dad nightly shifts to take care of a baby interrupted his sleep patterns and led to insomnia.

“When you’re lucky enough to be living out your dream and doing what you want, but because of something as simple as a lack of sleep, you’re unable to do that, it felt absolutely — it was treacherous,” he says in an interview-style video on the Quviviq website.

Endpoints News

Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription

Unlock this story instantly and join 142,600+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free.

Belén Garijo, Merck KGaA CEO (Kevin Wolf/AP Images for EMD Serono)

Mer­ck KGaA pumps €440M in­to ex­pand­ing and con­struct­ing Irish man­u­fac­tur­ing fa­cil­i­ties

The area of Ireland famous for Blarney Castle and its cliffsides along the Atlantic Ocean is seeing Merck KGaA expand its commitment there.

The German drug manufacturer is expanding its membrane and filtration manufacturing capabilities in Ireland. The company will invest approximately €440 million ($470 million) to increase membrane manufacturing capacity in Carrigtwohill, Ireland, and build a new manufacturing facility at Blarney Business Park, in County Cork, Ireland.

Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA) (Michael Brochstein/Sipa USA/Sipa via AP Images)

House Dems to Sen­ate lead­er­ship: Quick­ly move a rec­on­cil­i­a­tion bill with drug price ne­go­ti­a­tion re­forms

Twenty House Democrats, including Reps. Katie Porter of California and Susan Wild of Pennsylvania, are calling on Senate leaders to move quickly with a reconciliation bill (meaning they only need a simple majority for passage) with prescription drug pricing reforms, and to include adding new authority for Medicare to negotiate drug prices.

They also called on the Senate to specifically follow suit with the House passage of a $35 per month insulin cap (as Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer’s deadline for a vote on that provision has come and gone), and to cap Medicare Part D costs at $2,000 per year for seniors.

Phillip Gomez, SIGA CEO

UP­DAT­ED: On the back of SIGA Tech­nolo­gies' win with the FDA, the mon­key­pox virus sees the com­pa­ny spring­ing to fur­ther ac­tion

As the cases of monkeypox now sit at well over 100 worldwide and have spread to multiple continents, the orders for any type of vaccine against monkeypox are seeing nations and medical bodies looking to get their hands on anything and everything. And now SIGA Technologies seems to be getting in on the action.

According to Euronews, SIGA Technologies, a pharmaceutical company that is focused on providing medical countermeasures to biological and chemical attacks, is now in talks with several European authorities looking to stockpile its antiviral that can counter monkeypox. The drug known as tecovirimat or Tpoxx was approved by the FDA in 2018 as a vaccine for smallpox but was approved by the European Medicines Agency to also act against monkeypox, cowpox and complications from immunization with vaccinia.

Lutz Hegemann, Novartis president of global health

No­var­tis li­cens­es out leukemia drug as part of new glob­al coali­tion to in­crease ac­cess to can­cer treat­ments

The Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) has gathered a slate of Big Pharmas for its new collaboration in hopes of increasing access to cancer medicines in lower income countries, UICC announced yesterday.

Dubbed ATOM, or Access to Oncology Medicines, the coalition includes AstraZeneca, BeiGene, Novartis, Bristol Myers Squibb, Roche, Gilead, and Sanofi, among other organizations. The goal of the partnership is to increase generic and biosimilar development of cancer drugs as well as license out essential medicines to these countries. The third part of the partnership includes building up the infrastructure to diagnose cancers and properly handle cancer medicines.

Endpoints News

Keep reading Endpoints with a free subscription

Unlock this story instantly and join 142,600+ biopharma pros reading Endpoints daily — and it's free.

Bris­tol My­ers dusts off an old Cel­gene chemother­a­py for use in chil­dren with a rare blood can­cer

Bristol Myers Squibb is bringing new life to a chemotherapy drug from the old Celgene pipeline as it touts another approval in a rare form of blood cancer affecting young children.

The FDA on Friday approved Vidaza (chemically known as azacitidine) for pediatric patients 1 month and older with newly diagnosed juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML). The new indication marks the first approval for Vidaza in more than a decade, though it’s commonly used to treat acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS).