Matthew Porteus (Credit: Timothy Archibald for Stanford Children's)

Ver­sant teams up with Stan­ford gene edit­ing ex­perts on a $45M next-gen play — mar­ry­ing CRISPR and AAV to fix sick­le cell

When a re­searchers talk about gene edit­ing, they’re usu­al­ly think­ing about sev­er­al steps. First you need to ze­ro in on the de­fec­tive gene; then, de­pend­ing on the need, you’d want to knock out, re­place or in­sert ge­net­ic ma­te­r­i­al.

CRISPR/Cas9 tech­nolo­gies have trans­formed the field by mak­ing a break­through for the first prob­lem. In­duc­ing dou­ble-strand­ed DNA breaks, or achiev­ing sin­gle-let­ter changes as base edit­ing al­lows, have promis­ing ap­pli­ca­tions in mul­ti­ple dis­eases that are start­ing to get test­ed in hu­mans.

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Life Sciences Senior Associate

General Catalyst

San Francisco, CA, USA