Charles Nichols, LSU School of Medicine

Could psy­che­delics tack­le the obe­si­ty cri­sis? A long­time re­searcher in the field says his lat­est mouse study sug­gests po­ten­tial

Psy­che­delics have ex­pe­ri­enced a re­nais­sance in re­cent years amid a tor­rent of pre­clin­i­cal and clin­i­cal re­search sug­gest­ing it might pro­vide a path to treat mood dis­or­ders con­ven­tion­al reme­dies have on­ly scraped at. Now a pre­clin­i­cal tri­al from a young biotech sug­gests at least one psy­che­del­ic com­pound has ef­fects be­yond the mind, and — if you be­lieve the still very, very ear­ly hype — could pro­vide the first sin­gle rem­e­dy for some of the main com­pli­ca­tions of obe­si­ty.

A study in mice fund­ed by Eleu­sis and pub­lished in Sci­en­tif­ic Re­ports found a long-known drug called (R)-DOI could be used to treat car­dio­vas­cu­lar dis­ease, re­duc­ing in­flam­ma­tion in the aor­ta, de­creas­ing over­all and HDL cho­les­terol lev­els, and po­ten­tial­ly curb­ing di­a­betes by in­creas­ing glu­cose tol­er­ance.

Lead au­thor Charles Nichols says di­a­betes and high cho­les­terol, though of­ten re­sults of the same un­der­ly­ing con­di­tion, re­quire sep­a­rate drugs and a re­strict­ed di­et.

“This mod­el that treats car­dio­vas­cu­lar dis­ease and meta­bol­ic dis­ease — it’s all-en­com­pass­ing,” Nichols, a pro­fes­sor of phar­ma­col­o­gy at LSU, told End­points News. “Trans­lat­ed in­to the clin­ic in hu­mans, it would be as if some­one was obese, had di­a­betes, had high cho­les­terol, and was able to take a low dose of this drug at a sub-be­hav­ioral lev­el and re­al­ly treat sev­er­al dif­fer­ent as­pects of the com­pli­ca­tions of be­ing obese.”

They’re bold words, though al­most mut­ed in a psy­che­del­ic field brim­ming with hype. Re­searchers have called the re­sults of some psy­chi­atric stud­ies “mind-blow­ing” as clin­i­cal tri­als hint at the pow­er of psilo­cy­bin (the chem­i­cal in mag­ic mush­rooms) to al­le­vi­ate de­pres­sion and MD­MA to re­lieve PTSD.

David Nichols Pur­due

The no­tion that the same class of drugs might have oth­er phys­i­o­log­i­cal and specif­i­cal­ly an­ti-in­flam­ma­to­ry ef­fects is new­er. Nichols, the son of long­time psy­che­del­ic re­search pro­po­nent David Nichols, un­der­stands the rhetoric can get rosy but points out that the tri­al was tar­get­ed. They test­ed DOI in oth­er types of tis­sue and when it had lit­tle ef­fect, fo­cused on vas­cu­lar in­di­ca­tions.

“This is not a com­plete panacea,” said Nichols, who ear­li­er tout­ed his an­i­mal stud­ies in­di­cat­ing DOI’s po­ten­tial in asth­ma.

Nichols dis­cov­ered that sero­tonin 5-HT2A re­cep­tor ag­o­nists, fol­low­ing a well-un­der­stood path­way psy­che­delics act on, can re­duce in­flam­ma­tion by ac­ci­dent in his LSU lab in 2008. Lat­er, he got a cold call from Shlo­mi Raz, a for­mer Wall Street ex­ec­u­tive who went on to get a mas­ter’s in psy­chol­o­gy at NYU.

Eleu­sis launched in 2013 with a mis­sion, Raz told End­points, of ex­plor­ing the broad pos­si­bil­i­ties for these ag­o­nists, with their work so far rang­ing from a tri­al on the ef­fects of ‘mi­cro-dos­ing’ LSD on time per­cep­tion to fil­ing a patent for the treat­ment of Alzheimer’s with LSD. Nichols has pub­lished sev­er­al pre­vi­ous stud­ies on psy­che­delics and an­ti-in­flam­ma­to­ries, but this was no­table in its abil­i­ty to on­ramp in­to clin­i­cal tri­als.

Raz be­lieves what is com­mon­ly called psy­che­delics have a broad ar­ray of im­pacts be­yond their “psy­che­del­ic” func­tion. He says he has peer-re­viewed re­search com­ing soon that will help bol­ster that claim, and that the cen­tral ques­tion is how to un­lock those ef­fects with­out trig­ger­ing the psy­cho­log­i­cal im­pact.

“If you think of it as an ice­berg,” Raz said, “maybe the tip of the ice­berg is the psy­chi­atrics and the part be­low the sur­face is not psy­chi­atric.”

The vas­cu­lar study showed phys­i­o­log­i­cal with­out any psy­cho­log­i­cal ef­fects (mice giv­en a psy­che­del­ic can some­times show be­hav­ior con­sis­tent with psy­chosis). The re­searchers fat­tened up mice on the “West­ern di­et” for four months and at in­ter­vals ad­min­is­tered DOI to one group and saline to a con­trol.

They found that vas­cu­lar in­flam­ma­tion was low­er in the DOI, as they an­tic­i­pat­ed. They hadn’t an­tic­i­pat­ed that cho­les­terol would be down and glu­cose tol­er­ance up, and they’re still not sure why.

Nichols, though, said the study was trans­lat­able to a clin­i­cal tri­al, and he was hope­ful there would be a drug with­in 10 to 20 years. Reg­u­la­tion, more than the sci­ence, was the bar­ri­er. Raz was mum about what’s next, both in terms of oth­er ap­pli­ca­tions and in busi­ness mod­el, but he left one clue:

“I can tell you it’s not a pill,” he said, “at first.”

Pi­o­neer­ing Click Chem­istry in Hu­mans

Reimagining cancer treatments

Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for nearly 10 million deaths in 2020, which is nearly one in six deaths. Recently, we have seen incredible advances in novel cancer therapies such as immune checkpoint inhibitors, cell therapies, and antibody-drug conjugates that have revamped cancer care and improved survival rates for patients.

Despite this significant progress in therapeutic targeting, why are we still seeing such a high mortality rate? The reason is that promising therapies are often limited by their therapeutic index, which is a measure of the effective dose of a drug, relative to its safety. If we could broaden the therapeutic indices of currently available medicines, it would revolutionize cancer treatments. We are still on the quest to find the ultimate cancer medicine – highly effective in several cancer types, safe, and precisely targeted to the tumor site.

Ivan Cheung, Eisai US chairman and CEO

Bio­gen, Ei­sai re­fresh amy­loid hy­poth­e­sis with PhI­II show­ing Alzheimer's med slows cog­ni­tive de­cline

In the first look at Phase III data for lecanemab, Eisai and Biogen’s follow-up Alzheimer’s drug to the embattled Aduhelm launch, results show the drug passed with flying colors on a test looking at memory, problem solving and other dementia metrics.

One of the most-watched Alzheimer’s therapies in the clinic, lecanemab met the study’s primary goal on the CDR-SB — Clinical Dementia Rating-Sum of Boxes — giving the biotech the confidence to ask for full approval in the US, EU and Japan by next March 31. The experimental drug reduced clinical decline on the scale by 27% compared to placebo at 18 months, the companies said Tuesday night Eastern time and Wednesday morning in Japan.

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Nooman Haque, head of life sciences and healthcare at Silicon Valley Bank, and John Carroll

I’m head­ed to Lon­don soon for #EU­BIO22. Care to join me?

It was great getting back to a live ESMO conference/webinar in Paris followed by a live pop-up event for the Endpoints 11 in Boston. We’re staying on the road in October with our return for a live/streaming EUBIO22 in London.

Silicon Valley Bank’s Nooman Haque and I are once again jumping back into the thick of it with a slate of virtual and live events on October 12. I’ll get the ball rolling with a virtual fireside chat with Novo Nordisk R&D chief Marcus Schindler, covering their pipeline plans and BD work.

Gilead names 'k­ing­pin­s' in coun­ter­feit HIV med law­suit

Gilead is mounting its counterfeit drug lawsuit, naming two “kingpins” and a complex network of conspirators who allegedly sold imitation bottles of its HIV meds, some of which ended up in US pharmacies.

The pharma giant on Wednesday provided an update on what it called a “large-scale, sophisticated counterfeiting conspiracy,” accusing two new defendants of “leading and orchestrating” a scheme to sell hundreds of millions of dollars in illegitimate drugs posing as meds such as Biktarvy and Descovy.

Vlad Coric, Biohaven CEO (Photo Credit: Andrew Venditti)

As Amy­lyx de­ci­sion waits in the wings, Bio­haven’s ALS drug sinks (again) in plat­form tri­al

The FDA’s decision on Amylyx’s ALS drug is set to come out sometime Thursday. In a space with few drugs, any approval would be a major landmark.

But elsewhere in the ALS field, things are a bit more tepid.

Thursday morning, Biohaven announced that its drug verdiperstat failed its arm of an ALS platform trial led by Massachusetts General Hospital. According to a press release, the drug did not meet its primary endpoint — improvement on an ALS functional status test — or any key secondary endpoints at 24 weeks. The trial had enrolled 167 patients, giving them either verdiperstat or placebo twice a day.

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Pa­tient re­port finds con­sti­pa­tion con­di­tion not well man­aged, open­ing door for bet­ter ed­u­ca­tion from phar­ma

Advertising for constipation treatments often uses light-hearted humor in an effort to spur open discussions about the sometimes stigmatized topic. However, that may not be enough to get people to take the condition seriously, a new patient report from Phreesia finds.

Fewer than one-fifth (17%) of patients with constipation surveyed understand the longer-term health risks of constipation such as hemorrhoids and bowel incontinence. Many are trying to manage their condition with over-the-counter medicines, but often for much longer than recommended. An equal 68% say they use home remedies or OTC meds to manage constipation. But while 90% understand that OTCs are not intended for long-term use, 50% have used an OTC constipation medicine for more than a year.

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Cell and gene ther­a­pies from acad­e­mia: EMA to help 5 projects go­ing af­ter un­met clin­i­cal needs

The European Medicines Agency said Thursday that it’s launching a new pilot program to help academic and other nonprofit researchers developing advanced therapy medicinal products, which includes cell and gene therapies.

Academics have proven to be enormously useful in feeding new products, like chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell therapies first developed by Memorial Sloan Kettering, and ushered to the market by biopharma companies. Jean Bennett, formerly with the University of Pennsylvania, also saw her research lead to the approval of gene therapy Luxturna, which Roche now owns.

Tar­sus looks to raise aware­ness of eye­lid mite dis­ease in cam­paign aimed at eye­care spe­cial­ists

Eyelid mite disease may be “gross” but it’s also fairly common, affecting about 25 million people in the US.

Called demodex blepharitis, it’s a well-known condition among eyecare professionals, but they often don’t always realize how common it is. Tarsus Pharmaceuticals wants to change that with a new awareness campaign called “Look at the Lids.”

The campaign and website debut Thursday — just three weeks after Tarsus filed for FDA approval for a drug that treats the disease.

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Aligos co-founders Leonid Beigelman (L) and Lawrence Blatt

Ali­gos co-founders shoot back at J&J IP com­plaint with one of their own al­leg­ing fraud

This story goes all the way back to 2014.

In November of 2014, Johnson & Johnson acquired Alios BioPharma, an infectious disease biotech that was co-founded by Lawrence Blatt and Leonid Beigelman.

Following J&J’s 2014 acquisition, Blatt and Beigelman would become employees at J&J’s Janssen arm, with Blatt being the global head of infectious diseases and vaccines and Beigelman being Janssen’s VP of medicinal chemistry. But Blatt and Beigelman left Janssen in 2017, starting Aligos one year later.

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